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Nicola Ginsburgh

: a professed relative skill and education; self-sufficiency, which could include the provision for dependants; and productivity in manual labour – the process of creating tangible things – which was imagined as central to the production of civilisation. Yet many white workers failed to attain these signs of respectability. These trade union journals also show how shame and pride were used to condition workers’ behaviours, and, as expressed emotions, engendered individual and collective self-esteem. Barbara Rosenwein has argued that emotional expression is

in Class, work and whiteness
Race and settler colonialism in Southern Rhodesia, 1919–79

This book explores the class experiences of white workers in Southern Rhodesia. Interest in white identity, power and privilege has grown since struggles over white land ownership in Zimbabwe in the early 2000s, yet research has predominately focused on middle-class and rural whites. By critically building upon whiteness literature developed in the United States and synthesising theories of race, class and gender within a critical Marxist framework, this book considers the ways in which racial supremacy and white identity were forged and contested by lower-class whites. It demonstrates how settler anxieties over hegemonic notions of white femininity and masculinity, white poverty, Coloureds, Africans and ‘undesirable’ non-British whites were rooted in class experience and significantly contributed to dominant white worker political ideologies and self-understandings.

Based on original research conducted in the United Kingdom, South Africa and Zimbabwe, this book also explores how white workers used notions of ‘white work’ and white ‘standards of living’ to mark out racial boundaries. In doing so the author demonstrates how the worlds of work were embedded in the production of social identities and structural inequalities as well as how class interacted and intersected with other identities and oppressions. This book will be of interest to undergraduates and academics of gender, labour, race and class in African and imperial and colonial history, the history of emotions and settler colonial studies.

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Building the French empire
Benjamin Steiner

formally attached to a centre of administration. The building and buildings of empire, the processes and resulting monuments, represented an important binding force of this global cultural formation. In exploring this proposition, the book draws from several recent developments in historiography, including the study of material expressions of culture and emotion. While its wide geographical scope requires that the history of empire be viewed from a global vantage point, this needs to be combined with a microhistorical perspective to avoid the

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
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The empire as a material construct
Benjamin Steiner

spatially connected by means of material, emotions, and style. There were similarities between the building practices, the logistics, the co-operation with local contractors, the introduction of a classical Ludovican style, symbolic ornaments, and the methods of territorial enclosure. The space of the French empire can, therefore, be conceived as a non-linear expanse with connections that link different places closely together. The picture would be that of a tubulous world where the different colonial zones are connected by epistemic, aesthetic, and material

in Building the French empire, 1600–1800
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Nicola Ginsburgh

, gender and power rooted in the broader political economy. This book is heavily indebted to labour and social historians of Zimbabwe who have explored multiple struggles against exploitation and oppression, unearthed the complex relationships between class, gender, race, ethnicity and nationalism and examined the processes of capital accumulation and state power. 41 This work hopes to further illuminate these subjects through synthesising insights on whiteness, emotions, space, gender and imperial and settler colonial studies within a materialist class analysis of

in Class, work and whiteness
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Katie Donington

that remain in his hand betrayed no trace of emotion, but by their nature would hardly be the place for doubt and shame. In evidence given to the Select Committee in 1791 Hercules Ross recalled that seventeen years earlier Thomas senior had proposed a question to the Attic Society – a gentlemanly club made up of ‘the first characters of the place’. 50 The men considered ‘whether the

in The bonds of family
Katie Donington

favour of practical reason. To this end he called for ‘calm and solemn deliberation’, his inference being that the abolitionists placed too great a weight on irrational emotion. 88 He urged that ‘no popular sentiment out of doors, however assiduously and enthusiastically excited, ought to effect their deliberations’. In opening his arguments with these words George asserted the

in The bonds of family
The colony
Katie Donington

wife and his youngest son sick after an inoculation in Jamaica, Robert junior reflected on the conflicting emotions of living between metropole and colony: I hardly recollect any voyage where, all things considered, I had greater cause for anxiety & apprehension than at present. The unsettled situation in

in The bonds of family
The metropole
Katie Donington

alternately both lacking in and overcome by emotion. Abigail worried about what would happen to Esther ‘when I am gone’. 53 There was a plan for her to lodge at Halton in Cheshire but she fretted ‘if the Halton scheme does not suit, she is quite alone’. The fate of unmarried women following the death of their parents could be a source of concern and provisions had to be made to ensure that they did not slip into

in The bonds of family
Brett L. Shadle

describe how it sent ‘my heart into my brains’. He hoped that if whites truly understood his humiliation, if they could empathize with him, such acts would cease. He explicitly connected the incident with his emotions , ones which he expected his readers to share. Unfortunately for Tebajanga, settlers knew full well his humiliation, for that was their intention. For humiliation to really hit

in The souls of white folk