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Roger Luckhurst

This article investigates the role of the corridor in Gothic fiction and horror film from the late eighteenth century to the present day. It seeks to establish this transitional space as a crucial locus, by tracing the rise of the corridor as a distinct mode of architectural distribution in domestic and public buildings since the eighteenth century. The article tracks pivotal appearances of the corridor in fiction and film, and in the final phase argues that it has become associated with a specific emotional tenor, less to do with amplified fear and horror and more with emotions of Angst or dread.

Gothic Studies
Reading Extremities in Orra and De Monfort
Diane Long Hoeveler

At the time of their publication, Joanna Baillie‘s dramas were considered to be works of genius in their sustained and powerful fixation on one of the several possible human passions. In their very focus on these intense emotions, however, the plays actually reified the dangers inherent in the extremes of human passion. In other words, by fixing her attention on the passions, Baillie revealed that the emotions she was supposedly focused on often masked other, even more powerful desires. Thus, in Orra fear is the result of the heroines hatred of male dominance, while in De Monfort hatred is shown to be the symptom of incestuous love. But what has not been noticed about Baillie‘s plays is their almost obsessive interest in dead, abjected male bodies. Both plays present a very gothic vision of the indestructible patriarchy, an uncanny phallic power that cannot die, that persistently resurrects and feeds on itself or the legends that it has constructed.

Gothic Studies
Bram Stoker‘s The Jewel of Seven Stars
Andrew Smith

Smith explores how Stoker‘s novel raises some complex questions about love through its use of a male love-struck narrator, who appears to be caught in a Female Gothic plot which casts him as its hero. In the novel ‘love’ becomes increasingly sinister as it turns into a destabilising and dangerously irrational emotion that ultimately aligns love with feelings of justified horror. Jewel (1903, revised 1912) thus develops a male reading of a Female Gothic plot in which the idea of female empowerment becomes defined as horrific. However, this idea of a pathologised love, Smith argues, is not unique to Stoker and can be linked to Freud‘s account of love, which reveals how issues relating to male authority appear within psychoanalytical debates about emotion at the time.

Gothic Studies
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Reclaiming the Savage Night
David Punter

This article approaches a range of contemporary Scottish fiction: Iain Banks‘s Complicity and A Song of Stone, Irvine Welsh‘s Filth, Michel Faber‘s Under the Skin, James Robertson‘s Joseph Knight, Alan Guthrie‘s Savage Night and selected stories from Alan Bissett‘s Scottish Gothic anthology, Damage Land. The theme the article traces is pity, whether seen in a national or historical context, or as part of a wider panoply of what one might think of as ‘Gothic emotions’. The main contention is that it is possible that we reduce the scope of Gothic when we think of it as merely conducing to terror; whether we think of the earliest Gothic novels or of contemporary writing, there are often other feelings being stirred, a wider range of sensibilities being explored.

Gothic Studies
Amna Haider

Trauma realities defy easy access to comprehension and thus require alternative discourses to understand them. This article looks at Pat Barkers employment of the Gothic tropes in the examination and explication of war trauma in her Regeneration trilogy. More pertinently, it scrutinizes the complex relation between Gothicized landscapes and trauma by analyzing three specific sites – Craiglockhart War Hospital, trenches and England as ‘Blighty’ – in the Regeneration trilogy. This article shows traumas destabilizing impact by examining how landscapes become imprinted with trauma. The physical disempowerment of landscapes is further complemented by a psychological disempowerment by examining traumatized patient-soldiers mindscapes and dreamscapes. It further examines how Barker employs tropes of haunting, dreams and nightmares, staple Gothic emotions of fear, terror and horror, Freuds Unheimlich to dispossess the owners control and locates trauma realities lurking therein. Thus Barkers Regeneration narrative bears witness to the phantom realities of war trauma by privileging the uncanny personal histories of traumatized soldiers.

Gothic Studies
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Washington Irving’s Gothic afterlives
Yael Maurer

‘violent and conflicting emotions’ (75) at the sight of her, suggest that his ‘dream’ is actually a nightmare. The presence of the woman at this deathly scene and her intimate proximity to the guillotine evokes the ‘femme fatale’, a cultural figure that was most popular in the early and mid nineteenth century. As Heather Braun notes in The Rise and Fall of the Femme

in The Gothic and death
Christina Petraglia

him akin to the typical Petrarchan beauty, or even, as the narrator later specifies, ‘a supernatural being’ (II. 14). 9 His effeminate look, which is mentioned several times, coupled with his sentimentality, affiliates him with sensory, visceral space, apart from language, as he exudes emotions through physical reactions to stimuli. During a Carnival celebration, a boy who

in The Gothic and death
John Cameron Hartley

and death, and inspires love and fear in equal measure; if she at times appears fickle and unfathomable then the male characters display conflicting emotions too. Billali, Ayesha’s aide-de-camp , quotes a ‘proverb’ to express his wariness: ‘as for women, flee from them, for they are evil, and in the end will destroy thee’ (1994: 110). He later explains the Amahagger

in The Gothic and death
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Helen Wheatley

viewing as witness is less united in the ‘era of plenty’ (i.e. in the age of stratified, digital, multi-channel television viewing at the beginning of the twenty-first century), he concludes that it remains an important aspect of broadcast television, arguing that ‘[television] will be distinguished by its continuing, crucial, social role of working through the emotions provoked by the process of witness

in Gothic television
American Gothic television in the 1960s
Helen Wheatley

eighteenth century onwards, has been signalled by the capacity of Gothic formulae to produce laughter as abundantly as emotions of terror or horror. Stock formulas and themes, when too familiar, are eminently susceptible to parody and self-parody. (1996: 168) While the previous chapters of this book have concentrated on

in Gothic television