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Empire migration and imperial harmony
Stephen Constantine

and other interest groups at home and in the Empire, and aimed to form close contacts with dominion governments, not least by the appointment of its own British Migration Representative in Australia and in the dispatch of several missions of inquiry around the Empire. 16 Its first major responsibility was the launch in 1919 of the Imperial government’s plan for settling ex-service personnel and their

in Emigrants and empire
Scottish emigration in the twentieth century
Marjory Harper

World War the initiative shifted to Commonwealth governments, particularly in the Antipodes, which dictated the recruitment agendas and supplied most of the funding. The resurrection of free passages to ex-service personnel brought a trickle of Scots to Australia and New Zealand for a decade, 4 but better known and more popular was the reinstatement of civilian schemes, which

in Scotland, empire and decolonisation in the twentieth century
Marjory Harper

would oversee the renewed exodus. In April 1919 that committee – by then renamed the Oversea Settlement Committee (OSC) – was given a remit to devise and co-ordinate free passages and assisted emigration schemes for ex-service personnel and their dependents during a limited period, initially a year, beginning on 1 January 1920. In fact the scheme, introduced largely to appease veterans restive at unemployment and poor housing, lasted until March 1923 and assisted a total of 86,027 emigrants from 269,696 applicants. Free third

in Emigration from Scotland between the wars
Angela McCarthy

Settlement Act, enabled Scottish and Irish migrants from the north to avail 34 themselves of subsidised fares. Ex-service personnel, meanwhile, could travel to Australasia free of charge. Indeed, between 1923 and 1929 one third of 35 British emigrants to Canada and two-thirds to Australia received assistance. One of the most popular schemes operated between 1947 and 1975, allowing British migrants to travel to Australasia for £10. Regulations stipulated that migrants had to be single, under 35 years of age, and accept employ36 ment in certain occupations for two years

in Personal narratives of Irish and Scottish migration, 1921–65
Katie Pickles

committees, each with a secretary. The committees covered services, education, organization, citizenship and Empire study. Each level of the Order also chose a standard bearer for official ceremonies. Before the Second World War the services committee was split into child and family welfare, war and postwar services, and ex-servicespersonnel. In the post-Second World War years the services committee dealing with war

in Female imperialism and national identity
Stories of nursing, gender, violence and mental illness in British asylums, 1914-30
Vicky Long

, the prime objective appears to have been to protect men’s jobs and pay levels: equally, psychiatrists advocating female nurses were doubtless motivated in part by the attractions of a cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical 133 Mental health nursing profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The NAWU had sought to mobilise the support of ex-servicemen for its campaign. Ex-service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as

in Mental health nursing
Personal and group networks
Angela McCarthy

7 ‘A crony of my own type’: personal and group networks Lorna Carter was born in August 1923 to Englishman Harry Carter and Scotswoman Catherine MacDougall. Lorna was raised in Oban on the west coast of Scotland and in 1941 joined the Wrens. In 1951 she emigrated to New Zealand on board the Atlantis, claiming the complimentary passage that was available to ex-service personnel. Upon arrival she was housed by her mother’s relations and Lorna spent the next three years in New Zealand, writing to her parents usually at least once a week. It is from this voluminous

in Personal narratives of Irish and Scottish migration, 1921–65
Australia and British migration, 1916—1939
Michael Roe

Kingdom established its Oversea Settlement bureaucracy and determined to pay the fares of all ex-service personnel and their families who sought imperial emigration, while the National Relief Fund and the King’s Fund aided others affected by war and desirous of emigrating. By the end of 1922 some 35,000 migrants to Australia had received such aid. Meanwhile the Oversea Settlement Department dispatched to

in Emigrants and empire
Stephen Constantine

attract female domestic servants. An early decision replaced the pre-war cheap reates for domestics with free passages and allowed the lucky recruits £2 each to cover expenses. This generous provision was then made available under the scheme for ex-service personnel and under the Empire Settlement Act. 108 More potentially awkward was the recruiting of other workers. Prewar governments had explicitly

in Emigrants and empire
Vicky Long

cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The Union had sought to mobilise the support of ex-­servicemen for their campaign. Ex-­service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as the story unfolded in the national press. Parallel to the debate over the issue of women nursing on male wards, the Union discussed the allegations of cruelty by attendants made in the journal Truth by a former

in Destigmatising mental illness?