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Michael Robinson

's treatment of disabled ex-servicemen. The newly created Ministry of Pensions established legal pension rights and acknowledged accountability for the medical treatment and rehabilitation of disabled veterans. Nowhere is this development better exemplified than in the treatment of psychoneurotic ex-service personnel. Neurasthenic pensioners were in a much more favourable position than mentally ill British Army veterans of the preceding South African War who were, by comparison, regularly denied financial recompense and treated within the highly stigmatised and conservative

in Shell-shocked British Army veterans in Ireland, 1918–39
Stories of nursing, gender, violence and mental illness in British asylums, 1914-30
Vicky Long

, the prime objective appears to have been to protect men’s jobs and pay levels: equally, psychiatrists advocating female nurses were doubtless motivated in part by the attractions of a cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical 133 Mental health nursing profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The NAWU had sought to mobilise the support of ex-servicemen for its campaign. Ex-service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as

in Mental health nursing
Vicky Long

cheaper labour force, although a desire to improve the low status of psychiatry within the medical profession at large by refashioning asylums on the template of general hospitals was doubtless also a factor. The Union had sought to mobilise the support of ex-­servicemen for their campaign. Ex-­service personnel would, however, play a more multifaceted role as the story unfolded in the national press. Parallel to the debate over the issue of women nursing on male wards, the Union discussed the allegations of cruelty by attendants made in the journal Truth by a former

in Destigmatising mental illness?
Tommy Dickinson

why the SENs in this book participated in aversion therapy for sexual deviations. Militarisation of nursing Many mental nurses in the early 1940s were called up and assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps, and many ex-service personnel who had not previously worked in mental health entered mental nursing 166 ‘Subordinate nurses’ after World War II, owing to limited employment opportunities.121 Some nurses’ experiences during the war also had a positive impact on their attitude towards homosexuals and transvestites in their care (discussed in Chapter 4

in ‘Curing queers’
Tommy Dickinson

military service and assigned to the Royal Army Medical Corps.4 When the war ended many returned to the mental hospitals and numerous ex-service personnel who had not previously worked in mental health were noted to join the profession owing to limited employment opportunities.5 Nolan argues that one of the main attractions of mental nursing to demobilised soldiers was the military-style atmosphere of the hospitals and their excellent sporting facilities.6 Julian Wills was called up for military service during the war, and after demobilisation went on to train as a

in ‘Curing queers’