Search results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "humanitarian operations" x
  • Manchester Film and Media Studies x
  • All content x
Clear All
British news media, war and theory in the 2003 invasion of Iraq

This book analyses British news media coverage of the 2003 invasion of Iraq. It describes the analytical framework that serves as the basis for theoretically informed and systematic analysis of wartime media performance. The book synthesises a range of models, hypotheses and explanatory variables to set out a framework composed of three models of news media performance: the elite-driven model, the independent model and the oppositional model. It provides three case studies which, in different ways, illuminate each model of news media performance in wartime. The three case studies include the case of Jessica Lynch, the case of Ali Abbas and the case of the anti-war movement. The book then presents an account of how the relationship between foreign policy, news media and war might be expected to operate, based on current theoretical understanding. In order to place British coverage of the invasion in context, the book offers brief summaries of the structure and character of Britain's television news services and its press. The book provides an analysis of the ways in which the news media's visual depictions of the war reinforced supportive coverage. It is devoted to documenting and analysing evidence for negotiated and oppositional coverage. The book also examines the representation of civilian casualties, military casualties and humanitarian operations across both television and press, three subject areas that generated a good deal of media criticism.

Evidence for negotiated and oppositional coverage
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

6 ‘Independence, diversity and professional autonomy’: Evidence for negotiated and oppositional coverage Overview This chapter is devoted to documenting and analysing evidence for negotiated and oppositional coverage. This is done in three ways: first, by examining critical coverage that emerged across specific subject areas; second, by describing patterns of coverage in particular media outlets; and third, by presenting time series data. The chapter begins by examining the representation of civilian casualties, military casualties and humanitarian operations

in Pockets of resistance
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

, Livingston and Hebert (2005). The aim here was to assess whether journalists adopted either adversarial language or, alternatively, deferential or reinforcing language towards story actors. As recommended by Althaus (2003: 385–8), this measure provides an insight into the extent to which journalists themselves make critical contributions to news stories. Story subjects This measure identifies the subject matter of news reports – for example, a news report might focus on the military campaign itself, civilian or military casualties, humanitarian operations or the background

in Pockets of resistance
Abstract only
Patterns of support, negotiation and opposition
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

Oppositional model Sky, ITV, BBC Sun, Mail, Times, Telegraph Battle, justifications for war (esp. humanitarian) Channel 4 Mirror, Independent, Guardian Civilian casualties, military casualties, humanitarian operations, law and order Ali Abbas Mirror, Independent, Guardian Civilian casualties, military casualties, humanitarian operations, law and order Ali Abbas Jessica Lynch, anti-war movement Jessica Lynch case study provides an ‘ideal type’ example of the propensity of news media to champion ‘good news’ stories from the battlefront; moreover, it highlights the

in Pockets of resistance
The news media and war from Vietnam to Iraq
Piers Robinson, Peter Goddard, Katy Parry, Craig Murray, and Philip M. Taylor

on a distinction between the language and tone used by reporters (which can either be critical, supportive or neutral) and the subjects of news stories which, according to their definition, are unrelated to the issue of objectivity. As long as a journalist avoids overtly partisan or emotive language, a report is understood to be objective according to the classification provided by Aday and his team. This distinction, however, is open to question. A journalist might avoid a critical and evaluative tone when covering a story about coalition humanitarian operations

in Pockets of resistance