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Ireland in a global world
Series: Irish Society

Migration to and from Ireland is often the subject of definitive claims. During the 1980s, migration from Ireland was most commonly described as a brain drain. Despite the constant flows and counterflows, academic studies tend to focus on just one direction of movement, reflecting dominant concerns at particular points in time. The 1950s and the 1980s are characterized as decades of emigration, the Celtic Tiger era as a period of immigration, and the current recession is manifest as a return to mass emigration. This book addresses the three key themes from a variety of spatial, temporal and theoretical perspectives. The theme of networks is addressed. Transnational loyalist networks acted both to facilitate the speaking tours of loyalist speakers and to re-translate the political meanings and messages being communicated by the speakers. The Irish Catholic Church and specifically its re-working of its traditional pastoral, lobbying and development role within Irish emigrant communities, is discussed. By highlighting three key areas such as motives, institutions and strategies, and support infrastructures, the book suggests that the Irish experience offers a nuanced understanding of the different forms of networks that exist between a state and its diaspora, and shows the importance of working to support the self-organization of the diaspora. Perceptions of belonging both pre- and postmigration encouraged ethnographic research in six Direct Provision asylum accommodation centres across Ireland. Finally, the book provides insights into the intersections between 'migrancy' and other social categories including gender, nationality and class/position in the labour hierarchy.

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Ireland and its relationship with migration
Allen White and Mary Gilmartin

, and negotiating between more than one culture and identity. The final set of chapters provides insights into the intersections between ‘migrancy’ and other social categories including gender, nationality and class/position in the labour hierarchy. For Deirdre Conlon the ‘countertopographies’ of the experiences of different migrant women in Ireland speak to the intersections of their gendered experiences (as women, as mothers, as workers in insecure positions in the workplace) with their migrant status. The connections and common experiences of these women, despite

in Migrations
Race and nation in twenty-first-century Britain

Nationalism has reasserted itself today as the political force of our times, remaking European politics wherever one looks. Britain is no exception, and in the midst of Brexit, it has even become a vanguard of nationalism's confident return to the mainstream. Brexit, in the course of generating a historically unique standard of sociopolitical uncertainty and constitutional intrigue, tore apart the two-party compact that had defined the parameters of political contestation for much of twentieth-century Britain. This book offers a wide-ranging picture of the different theoretical accounts relevant to addressing nationalism. It briefly repudiates the increasingly common attempts to read contemporary politics through the lens of populism. The book explores the assertion of 'muscular liberalism' and civic nationalism. It examines more traditional, conservative appeals to racialised notions of blood, territory, purity and tradition as a means of reclaiming the nation. The book also examines how neoliberalism, through its recourse to discourses of meritocracy, entrepreneurial self and individual will, alongside its exaltation of a 'points-system' approach to the ills of immigration, engineers its own unique rendition of the nationalist crisis. There are a number of important themes through which the process of liberal nationalism can be documented - what Arun Kundnani captured, simply and concisely, as the entrenchment of 'values racism'. These include the 'faux-feminist' demonisation of Muslims.

Racial capitalism and workplace resistance
Ben Rogaly

Wilson Gilmore writes of racial capitalism that it is a mode of production developed in agriculture, improved by enclosure in the Old World, and captive land and labor in the Americas, perfected in slavery’s time motion field-factory choreography …14 80 stories from a migrant city The anthropologist Seth Holmes adds the category of citizenship, writing of an ‘ethnicity-citizenship labour hierarchy’ in the organisation of US agricultural labour and referring to his own ethnographic work in Californian berry farming and other studies carried out in the 1980s and 1990

in Stories from a migrant city
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Creative resistance to racial capitalism within and beyond the workplace
Agnieszka Coutinho, Jay Gearing, and Ben Rogaly

mode of production developed in agriculture, improved by enclosure in the Old World, and captive land and labor in the Americas, perfected in slavery's time–motion field–factory choreography. (Gilmore 2017 , 225–6) Anthropologist Seth Holmes adds the category of citizenship, writing of an ‘ethnicity–citizenship labour hierarchy’ in the organisation of US agricultural labour, referring to his own ethnographic work in Californian berry farming and other studies carried out in the

in Creativity and resistance in a hostile world
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The left and welfare state nationalism
Sivamohan Valluvan

thoroughly unflattering Renan passage dug out by Césaire when he excoriates the brutal labour hierarchies that colonial registers of racialisation were able to conjure, conceptions that Césaire rightly insisted were as likely to be subscribed to by scholarly ‘humanists’ like Renan as by more militant merchants of imperial civilisationism. Indeed, as Césaire asks when sardonically pondering the provenance of the following passage: ‘Hitler? Rosenberg? No, Renan.’ The regeneration of the inferior or degenerate races by the superior races is part of the providential order of

in The clamour of nationalism