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Autobiography, suffering and professions of faith
Sarah Ward Clavier

, their episcopalian counterparts are frequently neglected.3 This is partly because self-­examination and self-criticism in diaries or notebooks were inherent to most strains of puritanism, emerging from within experimental Calvinism within the Elizabethan period, whereas it was apparently not so crucial to mainstream or conservative episcopalians.4 A search for the life-writing of Restoration bishops, therefore, is necessarily more difficult. None the less, such texts do exist. Several of those who were to be appointed to the episcopate petitioned Charles II in 1660

in Church polity and politics in the British Atlantic world, c. 1635–66
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Laurence Lux-Sterritt

the nuns’ own writings reveal, in beautiful and nuanced detail. Notes 1 Katrien Daemen-de Gelder (ed.), Life Writing II, vol. 4, in Caroline Bowden (ed.), English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800 (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2013), pp. xiv-xv. 2 I would like to thank Sister Benedict, at St Mary’s Abbey, Colwich, for her insights on this subject. 3 James Kelly (ed.), Convent Management, vol. 5, in Caroline Bowden (ed.), English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800 (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2013), pp. 411–21. 4 James Kelly, ‘Essex girls abroad: family patronage

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
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Laurence Lux-Sterritt

histories of their own communities and, as they did so, they became record keepers, historians and hagiographers, in charge of the perpetuation of their communities’ memories. They also wrote about their lives before and after they entered the convent, and such life writing played an important part in the proselytising endeavours of writers who aimed to edify through the dissemination of inspiring Catholic lives. Others expressed their views about issues relating to the governance of communities; they revealed fascinating glimpses into the ways early modern nuns envisaged

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
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Freethinking feminists and the renunciation of religion
Laura Schwartz

masculine mode of life-writing was increased further by their use of an inverted form of spiritual biography. Freethinking accounts of spiritual turmoil and inner torment subverted the Christian conversion narrative, leading to the conclusion that religion was false; that rather than struggling against one’s doubts one should follow them through; and that unbelief rather than union with God should be the outcome of this critical

in Infidel feminism
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

Countrey’, in Caroline Bowden (ed.), English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800 (London: Pickering & Chatto, 2012), vol. 3, Life Writing, edited by Nicky Hallett, pp. 367–72. 52 Elliott, ‘The physiology of rapture p. 142: Elliott offers an etymological analysis of the terms ‘rapture’ (to seize, to ravish), and ‘ecstasy’ (outside one’s senses). 53 CRS Misc. XI, Ghent, p. 39. 54 Ibid., pp. 59–60. 55 Weld-Blundell (ed.), Contemplative Prayer, p. 388. 56 Tobie Matthew, The Relation of the Holy and Happy Life and Death of the Ladye Lucie Knatchbull, printed in Nicky

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
James E. Kelly

Carisbrooke, Isle of Wight, ‘Records of the nuns of the second order’, p. 197. 64 K. Daemen-de Gelder, ‘Life writing II’, English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800, vol. 4, pp. xiii–xiv, 2–3. 65 Douai Abbey, C2, pp. 258–9, 297–8. Elizabeth Lombard, who professed as a lay sister at the convent in 1623, had been converted to Catholicism by a Jesuit resident at St Omer college: ibid., pp. 261–2; WWTN, GP222. Another future president of Douai, George Fisher, alias Muscote, had received Elizabeth Hone into the church and recommended several convents to her before she was

in College communities abroad
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

Benedictines, 1609– 1642 (Toronto: PIMS, forthcoming). 37 ADN, Ms 20H-40 ‘God is to be loved above all things’, unfoliated. 38 Colwich Abbey, Ms H23, fols 209–10. 39 Tobie Matthew, The Relation of the Holy and Happy Life and Death of the Ladye Lucie Knatchbull, printed in Nicky Hallett (ed.), English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800, vol. 3, Life Writing (London: Pickering and Chatto, 2012), p. 169. 40 Ibid., p. 181. 41 Ibid., p. 199. 42 Corrigan (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Religion and Emotion, p. 8. 43 Fear played a central role in both religious discourse and

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
Laurence Lux-Sterritt

/2, Scholastica Smith, undated document. 47 Ibid., Mary Roper to the archbishop of Mechelen, 9 April 1623. 48 Ibid., Christina Lovell, undated visitation document 28. 49 Ibid., Lucy Knatchbull, undated document. 50 AAM, Box 12/1, Anne Ingleby to the archbishop of Mechelen, undated (August 1628). 51 Ibid., Anne Ingleby to the archbishop of Mechelen, 28 August 1628. 52 Tobie Matthew, The Relation of the Holy and Happy Life and Death of the Ladye Lucie Knatchbull (unfoliated section), printed in Nicky Hallett (ed.), English Convents in Exile, 1600–1800, vol. 3, Life

in English Benedictine nuns in exile in the seventeenth century
Tom Betteridge

endangered the continuation of the text itself. See D.R. Woolf, ‘The Rhetoric of Martyrdom: Generic Contradiction and Narrative Strategy in John Foxe’s Acts and Monuments’, in The Rhetorics of Life Writing in Early Modern Europe: Forms of Biography from Canandra Fedde to Louis XIV, ed. Thomas F. Mayer and D.R. Woolf (Michigan: 1995), pp. 243–282, p. 259. 112 Patrick Collinson comments: ‘an analysis of Foxe’s rhetorical and polemical art … might depict a style in transition from the racy vulgarity of many of his sources and of his more polemical passages to the decorousness

in Literature and politics in the English Reformation
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Elizabeth Clarke and Robert W. Daniel

Cambers’ assertion that there existed a significant paradigm within religious manuscript writing which consisted of ‘sociability and the self’. 28 William Sherman's research on the ‘dynamic ecology of use and reuse’ of printed books equally applies to manuscript life-writing, a major theme in this volume, whereby the use of devotional texts leads to their frequent ‘transformation’ and ‘preservation’. 29 A wealth of recent research, outlined by Zeynep Tenger and Paul

in People and piety