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Metabiographical method
Justin D. Livingstone

” Brontës in their place’. 31 Instead of engaging in iconoclastic demystification, in order to reveal the ‘real’ Brontës, she offers ‘a book about biography, a metabiography’, which exposes ‘just how malleable the raw material’ of life-writing can be. 32 Patricia Fara takes largely the same approach to ‘Newton’s posthumous reputations’. Without explicitly declaring a metabiographical

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
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Sins, psyche, sex
Justin D. Livingstone

operandi , Jeal casts aside Livingstone’s sense of divine calling as little more than a shroud for naked ambition. These revisionist biographies, while productively challenging, and perhaps enlarging, our conception of Livingstone, should thus not be seen as definitive. They reflect a contemporary pathographic mentality dominated by an impulse towards unmasking, a trend in life-writing in which greatness is

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
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Lamenting Livingstone
Justin D. Livingstone

an end eminently appropriate to Livingstone’s lifetime of labour. As Hermione Lee observes, biographies, and we may extend the point to other forms of life-writing, often seek to ensure that death encapsulates the subject’s existence and meaning. She points to the tendency ‘to make the moment of their subject’s death sum up and conclude the whole story of their life’. 29 By emphasising that

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
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Making Missionary Travels
Justin D. Livingstone

become the primary tensions of the tale, the traveler’s encounter with the other its chief attraction’. 6 In other words, the travelogue has an autobiographical function and so to some extent can be considered a form of life-writing. In thinking about Missionary Travels in this way, it becomes clear that the text signals towards, and serves to constitute, Livingstone’s public persona. In fact, even by

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
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Imperial afterlives
Justin D. Livingstone

comments are too sweeping, and others have justly pointed to the diversity of Victorian life-writing and its considerable expansion of suitable biographical subjects: as Hermione Lee observes, it was not quite as ‘monolithic’ and ‘stolid’ as it has sometimes been represented. 7 Nonetheless, for the Victorians biography did perform the function of a ‘canonizing tool’, and it was undeniably conspicuous for

in Livingstone’s ‘Lives’
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Testimony, memoir and the work of reconciliation
Gillian Whitlock

and discursive break in race relations in the past ten years, as Armitage suggests? Failed attempts to produce more dialogic forms of life writing which encompass indigenous and non-indigenous histories, the example yet again of the troubling outcomes of benevolence and the impotence of good intentions, the reminder that First Nations’ peoples must contend with the fact that they frequently gain access to power and knowledge in ways which are carefully managed by non-indigenous interests: all these are entirely congruent

in Rethinking settler colonialism
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Will Jackson

In 1951, just months before the announcement of a state of emergency in Kenya signalled the onset of the colony’s violent demise, a book was published in Nairobi. Entitled Under the Sun , the book was an affectionate biography of the late Dr Roland Burkitt, written by his erstwhile friend and mentee, Joseph Gregory. 1 As an example of late colonial life-writing, the

in Madness and marginality
The letter and the gift
Andrew J. May

not expect any regular correspondence in return: ‘it would be very foolish, not to say sinful, for me to be sent all the way to India, to spend my life writing to my friends at home’. 48 In the flow of information, therefore, John Roberts played a crucial role, and the correspondence was intimate and everyday, as well as part of an official genre. 49 As a personal friend, he

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
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Emily J. Manktelow

chronological, ideological and missiological shifts such biographies reflect). Despite this chequered history, however, biographies are making a comeback. In Colonial Lives Lambert and Lester have argued that a properly nuanced form of biographical life-writing ‘remains a powerful way of narrating the past’. 54 That two chapters within that book deal directly with missionaries (Lancelot Threlkeld, missionary to the South Seas and Australia, and William Shrewsbury, missionary in the Caribbean and Africa) demonstrates the way in

in Missionary families