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Martin Heale

The liturgy – the regular round of services in worship of God – was the core of the monastic life. Numerous liturgical manuscripts survive, mainly from larger houses, detailing for the inmates’ benefit how these services should be ordered. The study of liturgical books is a highly complex and specialist field, and as a result this section makes

in Monasticism in late medieval England, <i>c.</i> 1300–1535
E.A. Jones

underscored the idea that anchorites were dead to the world by numerous striking echoes of the medieval liturgy of death and burial: from the procession through the cemetery to reach the cell, to the psalms and antiphons chosen, the performance of the ‘last rites’, the open grave and the sprinkling of dust upon the recluse. 3 The verbatim recording of an anchorite’s profession [ 6 ] is a late development, and perhaps

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
E.A. Jones

the uncompromising repression of heresy, the early fifteenth century is now recognised for its movement of orthodox reform, which saw (amongst other developments) a monastic revival and a renewal of the liturgy. 1 We have already seen evidence of increased scrutiny of potential anchorites in this period (see Chapter I , especially [ 2 ]), and the attention paid to the solitary vocations in the

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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E.A. Jones

some idea of how the problem was (at least partly) resolved. The sources collected in this book fall in general into two classes. Either they are concerned with individual hermits or anchorites in their particular circumstances, or they come from theoretical or prescriptive texts such as rules or liturgy whose relation to the lived experience of real solitaries it is usually impossible to recover. 13

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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Gervase Rosser

. 17 See further C. Kipling, Enter the King. Theatre, Liturgy, and Ritual in the Medieval Civic Triumph , Oxford, 1998; H. Carrel, ‘The rituals of town–crown relations in post-Black Death England’, in F. Andrews (ed.), Ritual and Space in the Middle Ages , Donington, 2011, pp. 148–64. 18

in Towns in medieval England
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C. E. Beneš

would not have distinguished between these and more ‘factual’ documents. 85 Christian authorities. Probably the most-cited work in Jacopo's Chronicle is the Bible, which he would have come to know profoundly in his years of prayer, preaching, and liturgy. While he certainly would have had copies of the Bible (or of individual books of the

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

of the monks and the liturgy. Cf. VA c. 68, col. 1542C. 312 I.e., the monks of Corvey. 313 Isaiah 58:9–10: Si abstuleris de medio tui catenam et desieris digitum extendere et loqui quod non prodest, cum effuderis esurienti animam tuam et animam adflictam repleveris, orietur in tenebris lux tua et tenebrae tuae erunt sicut meridies (‘If thou wilt take away the chain out of the midst of thee and cease to stretch out the finger and to speak that which profiteth not, when thou shalt pour out thy soul to the hungry and shalt satisfy the afflicted soul, then

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

remain anonymous also distinguishes him from many of his better-known contemporaries. A number of internal clues, however, suggest that this remarkable author may well have been the monk who would become Abbot Gebhard I (r. 1164–1170/1173). His striking level of interest in all things liturgical – from vestments, to books, to processions – suggests that he was the community’s cantor, the individual charged with oversight of all aspects of the liturgy as well as the production and keeping of books. 12 Further, as recent studies have demonstrated, it was not uncommon

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

pronouncements is in keeping with the chronicler’s repeated interest in monastic fires in his writings, even prior to the one that destroyed much of Petershausen in 1159 (cf. CP 4.14, 4.15, and 4.17). 19 A cope is a long liturgical vestment generally made of silk or other fine cloth. The semicircular garment is open at the front and fastened with a clasp at the breast. It is characteristic of the chronicler’s interest in matters related to the performance of the liturgy that he mentions these cloaks and the creation of vestments from it rather than any other details of

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

kidneys (sometimes translated as reins), were seen as symbolic of the human conscience, and only God has knowledge of this innermost being. For example, see Jer. 20:12. 99 Matt. 25:14–30. 100  The listing of books produced by and for Theodoric adds weight to the argument that the chronicler was Petershausen’s cantor, whose duties included managing the monasteries book collections, as noted above on p. 4, and highlights again the emphasis within Hirsau communities on liturgy, devotional reading, and biblical study.

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany