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Gemma King

perhaps more than any other filmmaker working in the French space today, Jacques Audiard is both the ideal subject to complement a book series named French Film Directors, and the ideal one to challenge it. Audiard is at once an archetypal French film director and one who tests the definitions of each of these terms. He is of French nationality, but he operates in an increasingly transnational and

in Jacques Audiard
Dave Rolinson

mother visits her socially mobile daughter and her outwardly successful friends in London. But when such questions of identity are raised, they are more often focused around nationality, as in Penda’s Fen and Made in Britain, or masculinity, which complicates the public and grammar school undercurrents of Sovereign’s Company and the territorial marking of The Firm. This generation seized the importance of television as, in Stephen Frears’s phrase, a ‘tremendously new democratic, populist medium’ (Own Man). They made the ‘politically motivated’ decision to enter

in Alan Clarke
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Thomas Hajkowski

the separate BBC networks to serve Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland created listening communities in those areas as well, contributing to the development of national consciousness in these regions. In addition to Benedict Anderson, the work of Rogers Brubaker plays an influential part in the theoretical framework of this book. In Nationalism Reframed, Brubaker argues that nationality or “nation-ness” is not “an entity but … a contingent event.”10 National identity is not a thing that individuals have, but rather something they experience or perform at

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
John Corner

: There’s a lot of ambiguity to the image, who the women are, what they’re thinking, what kind of background do they come from? I hear a different interpretation of it every day, and I’m somewhat sympathetic with them all. (‘Through The Looking Glass’, www.onthemedia.org, 4 May 2007) Speaking on a short presentation placed on the World Press Photo website after the award had been made, he elaborated on the range and scale of interpretations: You go online and there are 12, 15, 20 different interpretations from 20 different nationalities and backgrounds, about what they

in Theorising Media
Dheepan and Les Frères Sisters
Gemma King

reflects the dissolution of any stable connection between a film’s place of production and/or setting and the nationality of its makers and performers … The concept of transnationalism enables us to better understand the changing ways in which the contemporary world is being imagined by an increasing number of filmmakers across genres as a global system

in Jacques Audiard
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Sue Vice

out as he comes down the stairs: ‘Maria! Gretta!’, and then as he enters the living-room where Carmella is cleaning: ‘Um … Ursula … Yvonne ….’ In this instance, humour arises from Hugh’s inability, as a wealthy Cheltenham-based professional working in ‘financial services’, to distinguish between the many women of varied nationalities who have cleaned his house. It relies upon the viewer’s knowledge of late-twentieth-century patterns of casual labour, as well as, in dramatic terms, conveying Hugh’s guilty conscience – he is flustered not because he is embarking on an

in Jack Rosenthal
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Gemma King

discipline, the study of national cinemas – in conjunction with auteur theory – was widely and unproblematically accepted’ (Hjort and MacKenzie, 2000 : 2). The connection between nationality and auteur status is particularly noticeable in Audiard’s case. Rosanna Maule acknowledges that the lines delimiting national cinemas and definitions of the film auteur have long

in Jacques Audiard
Thomas Hajkowski

from his belief that the North constituted a distinct, historic, cultural commu- Rethinking regional broad­casting in Britain, 1922–53 nity. But Coatman, a staunch imperialist, had a more pressing reason for timely return of the English regions: It would be extremely dangerous to propose to have only three territorial broadcasting regions, namely Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland, on the grounds of their separate nationalities … if we make them, and them alone, into ­territorial broadcasting regions because of their separate nationality, then it is quite certain

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
The BBC and national identity in Scotland
Thomas Hajkowski

a powerful sense of “Scottishness” through its organizational structure, policy, and programs. Technical and financial considerations may have, in part, driven the regional scheme, but BBC Scotland existed to reflect the politics, society, life—in short the culture—of Scotland. Special days such as St Andrew’s Day or Burns Night allowed for the expression of Scottish nationality. Further, BBC Scotland did not represent Scottishness in a caricatured, one-dimensional way. It did indulge in its fair share of nostalgia and kailyard and just plain stereotype, but the

in The BBC and national identity in Britain, 1922–53
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Dramaturge and mauvais esprit
Sarah Leahy and Isabelle Vanderschelden

of identities and nationality that such cinema vehicles, and of the potential of such cinema in terms of identity’. Spaak contributed to numerous screenplays that feature or even help to establish just such ‘mythical’ narratives, characters and settings. An examination of his cinematic output from the perspective of character, theme and setting (milieu) can therefore help us not just to understand more

in Screenwriters in French cinema