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Karin Fischer

moral and spiritual traits. Illustrations of this could be found in comments made by school inspectors, with, for example, Deputy-Chief Inspector of National Schools Seumas Fenton declaring in 1938, as part of a conference on ‘Tradition and Nationality’ reproduced in the Irish School Weekly, that ‘[the Irish people’s] afflictions were purifications of the spirit, preparatory to final national triumph’.68 Along similar lines, the idea of a symbiosis between the national and spiritual ideals was central in the historical perspective of Minister for Education Richard

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
John Anderson

to inclusiveness and reinforce the arguments of those who want to restrict participation to members of the dominant nationality. In the worst case scenario, it might be used to justify restriction of minority rights and even physical repression of those belonging to other ethno-confessional communities. We can certainly see this in Greece, where there has historically been little distinction between being Greek and being Orthodox. The first constitutional text of 1822 classifies as Greeks ‘all natives who believe in Christ’, and this

in Christianity and democratisation
Karin Fischer

boys and girls on an equal basis, regardless of social background, financial status, religion, race, nationality, gender, educational standard or physical challenges. All, however, is subject to the existing availability of appropriate resources in the school.80 Ardscoil La Salle upholds a particular ‘characteristic spirit’ and ‘the religious and educational philosophy of the De La Salle Brothers’ and expects first-year applicants to ‘be willing to accept the school ethos’, which is, however, one step down from Dominican College’s expectation for parents and pupils

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
What role for schools?
Karin Fischer

tendency to consider such programmes as being outside the range of social priorities. For example, in 2008, a primary school in a Dublin suburb with a very significant intake of ‘newly arrived’ immigrant children (nearly 400 children of forty-seven nationalities and almost as many languages) had seen the number of its language-support teachers fall from nine to six. The 2009 public-service cuts reduced this number to two teachers, while the needs remained the same, as was pointed out in an interview on RTÉ Radio 1 by Enda McGorman, head of the school at the time.63 69

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
John Anderson

). 63 Ibid., p. 17. 64 See M. Bourdeaux, Religious Ferment in Russia (London: Macmillan, 1968). 65 M. Bourdeaux, Patriarchs and Prophets (London: Macmillan, 1970). 66 An overview of its activities can be found in V. Stanley Vardys, The Catholic Church, Dissent and Nationality in Soviet Lithuania (New York: East European Quarterly, 1978); an account relying on extensive extracts can be found in M. Bourdeaux, Land of Crosses – The Struggle for Religious Freedom in Lithuania, 1939

in Christianity and democratisation