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Allyn Fives

politics, on the other. Berlin himself identifies a division of labour between theoretical reflection and practical judgement: he shows that the former has not been successful in its various attempts to identify the general rule for the resolution of moral conflicts, leaving that instead in the realm of practical reasoning and practical judgement. One area where practical reasoning and judgement is required is the decision to tolerate difference. I would say that toleration of difference is not logically entailed by value pluralism. Rather, whether or not we tolerate any

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

pluralists, theory will not resolve these dilemmas for us. As Berlin says, although we can offer reasons to justify the way in which we resolve a moral conflict in a specific situation, crucially, the reasons ‘cannot always be clearly stated, let alone generalised into rules or universal maxims’ (Berlin 2004 [1958] , pp. 172–3). Hence, according to value pluralism, political theory does not provide us with the general rule to resolve moral conflicts. When we resolve conflicts, we do so by exercising practical reason and practical judgement. Shklar

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
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Orangeism, Protestantism, anthropology
Joseph Webster

Christianity as religious ‘values’ ( Robbins 2007 ) and ethics as ‘practical judgement’ ( Lambek 2010 : 61) strive for. And it is here, furthermore, precisely at the point where neither religion nor ethics is able to claim a monopoly over imaginative reflection or ordinary action, where we begin to ethnographically appreciate how belief may become a kind of practice, and how practice may become a kind of belief. As we shall see, this is the case among Scots-Orangemen insofar as religious transcendence is never just transcendence, but also finds itself indebted to the

in The religion of Orange politics
Marc Geddes

consequently requires practical judgements as well as taken-for-granted or tacit knowledge. This suggests that everyday practices as performances can have a range of elements. In this chapter, I limit my discussion to three (style, speech and space) and draw from one of the founding fathers of dramaturgy, Erving Goffman. Style . Goffman ( 1990 , pp. 34–5) identifies two elements of what I term a

in Dramas at Westminster