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E.A. Jones

transgressions he should be punished according to canon law, and legally restrained so that he ceases from these transgressions in the future, with the penalty to be imposed upon him reserved to us and to those same auditors, according as it appears to us plainly from what has transpired before the said commissaries and the report they have made of it to us. And so by strict command we entrust to you our order that you

in Hermits and anchorites in England, 1200–1550
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Gervase Rosser

it], then the suit of that tenement shall be held. And if by judgement he is put in mercy [convicted], he shall make good his transgression, according to the degree of the crime, by the view of his equals, such that the fine shall not exceed 10 s. And if one of the burgesses ( burgencium ) should die having made division of his goods within this lordship, then that division shall stand. If, however, he

in Towns in medieval England
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Gervase Rosser

hurtful to the lord the king in buying hides, and because they correct transgressions which ought to be pleaded before the bailiffs; fined 13 s 4 d. 42 other tanners likewise. 1292–93 The cobblers fined 20 s because they have a guild contrary to the prohibition of the lord king, 15 whereby they take of their apprentices 2 s , and those who carry on the

in Towns in medieval England
Gervase Rosser

of the Borough of Nottingham , 3 vols, London: Quaritch, 1882–85, i, pp. 115–17. Latin, transl. by the editor, revised by GR. On 24 October 1330, Robert de Morewode brings a case against Henry le Waterleader on a plea of transgression: he complains that as Henry is a common servant ( communis serviens ) to carry water by bushels* to sell to all men of Nottingham wishing

in Towns in medieval England
C. E. Beneš

highest pontiff kept the bishop of the Venetians, who had gone to the curia regarding another matter, there on account of this matter as well. 54 Then through his legates he declared truces between the cities, which he ordered observed until the coming feast of Saint John the Baptist [24 June 1295] under pain of excommunication, which he ordered applied immediately to any who transgressed. Then two

in Jacopo Da Varagine’s Chronicle of the city of Genoa
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

. Nonetheless, there are fathers, brothers and fellow students who were witnesses to what you are talking about, and they know that, like a farmer weeding a field, he wielded the word and judgement of correction like a hoe at the first appearance of sin, so that Christ’s harvest would sprout up more abundantly. For he did not behave as some people do and continue to deliberate while transgressions were springing up, but in every case he immediately struck down the source of sin with the sword of his words. How, then, could he be so negligent as to spare his own, when he never

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Mayke de Jong and Justin Lake

is Christ.’ When he had finished speaking, I was reduced to a confused silence. And it is evident that he had no consideration except for what was according to God and because of God, and concerning the emperor and his sons, the fatherland and churches, the chief men and magnates, and the practice of the faith and the salvation of the people, because he did not pursue his own interests in anything, but rather those that were of Christ. Anyone who thinks, therefore, that Arsenius risked exile and death because he committed some transgression 90 in this affair by

in Confronting crisis in the Carolingian empire
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Condemnation of Wyclif’s teaching
Stephen Penn

are present according to their substances or natures, but only the species of these, under which species the body and blood of Christ are really contained, not only figuratively or tropically, but essentially, substantially and corporally. Hence, Christ is there truly in his own bodily presence: this must be believed, taught and defended strenuously against all who say the opposite. We therefore exhort you in the Lord, and in our authority we will offer a warning on the occasion of your first, second and third transgressions, and then we will

in John Wyclif
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Alison I. Beach, Shannon M.T. Li, and Samuel S. Sutherland

carefully in Book One. He describes, for example, a struggle between the monastery and Gebhard II’s successor, Bishop Lambert of Constance (r. 995–1018), over his demand for monastic goods to support the diocese of Bamberg, recently established by Henry II. Although Lambert’s demands were in clear violation of the exemptions described in CP 1.37 and 1.38, he persisted in pressing his demands and finally resorted to taking by force treasure given to the monastery by Gebhard II himself. For his transgressions, the chronicler claims with some relish, Lambert was struck down

in Monastic experience in twelfth-century Germany
Rachel Stone and Charles West

confess my transgressions unto the Lord, and thou forgavest the iniquity of my sin’ [Psalms 31:5]. The Lord proffers forgiveness, not punishment, to a confession that is not extorted by fear, but rather brought forth in hope of indulgence through medicinal encouragement, as again he [the Psalmist] says: ‘And of my own will shall I confess to Him’ [Psalms 27:7]; a confession which

in The divorce of King Lothar and Queen Theutberga