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Re-visioning family change
Jane Gray, Ruth Geraghty, and David Ralph

) and then cohabiting couples (5.9 per cent). Such households would have been exceptional in Ireland when Seamus and John, whose stories we examined in Chapter 1, were starting their families. Figure 2.1 provides an overview of family household composition in Ireland, Denmark and Portugal in 2009, based on the European Survey on Income and 30 Denmark Ireland Portugal 25 20 15 10 5 0 Single person aged under 65 Single person aged 65+ Couple both under 65 Couple 1 or both aged 65+ Couple + dependent children Couple + adult children Lone parent + dependent

in Family rhythms
Bryan Fanning

Benson’s imaginary future changes dramatically. It becomes one in which Catholic social and political thought has been implemented worldwide, where the great political economists of the day consult cardinals and where Ireland has been turned into the contemplative monastery of Europe. At the beginning of the twentieth century Catholic thinkers were preoccupied with the threats that secular, liberal and social ideals presented to religiosity. In his 1907 novel Lord of the World, Benson had imagined a future world dominated since 1917 by socialism, freemasonry and

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Peter J. Martin

analysts dissect it, or Cambridge University Press publish Adlington’s book?) These beliefs, in turn, may be seen to be derived from a more general ideology of artistic modernism which legitimates this work and the activities of figures such as Birtwistle. From a sociological perspective, it is this discourse, this framework of legitimation, and the claims and activities it licenses, which are of primary analytical interest, rather than ‘the music’ itself. Cases such as that of Birtwistle’s music, where questions of meaning and interpretation are constantly foregrounded

in Music and the sociological gaze
Bryan Fanning

once an instrument of British policy and, even more pernicious, an instrument of progress. A section of the essay was headed ‘Against Modernism’. Never averse to hyperbole Pearse claimed that the old Irish, ‘two thousand years ago’, had the best and noblest education system ever known amongst men. Here he meant the schools described in the legends of Cúchulainn. In lectures and his essays he was, as one of his friends Joseph Holloway put it, ‘indiscriminately eulogistic to absurdity’ about the literary merits of the Gaelic sagas that he came to treat as history.8 As

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Bryan Fanning

-and-span for the occasion, hung with flowered garlands FANNING 9781784993221 PRINT.indd 177 19/01/2016 13:25 178 Irish adventures in nation-building and bunting that must have called for hours of work, with an inspiring altar at one end and miniature altars in many windows down the way you realise that here indeed lives the fervent Catholic faith of the Irish, whose survival is one of the world’s miracles – that here the flood of Modernism has not touched the creed in which these children of the poor were raised.27 Irish identities rooted in Catholicism found

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Peter J. Martin

erroneous, view of the improviser as an inspired individual guided only by intuition, and in addition to supplement psychological studies of improvisation (see Pressing, 1988) by recontextualising the musicians and their performances. Moreover, even a cursory examination of the specific culture of the art worlds in which jazz players operate shows the fundamental importance of performance practice in the aesthetics of these groups, in marked contrast, for example, to the central position occupied by the composition of works in the European artmusic tradition. With this in

in Music and the sociological gaze