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Rosemary O’Day

Database, the Foxe Project or the ODNB. There is a concern that the normal critical faculties of academics have been suspended when faced with glossy and well-organized databases of this kind: it is as well to remember that a database of any kind is only as good as the source materials upon which it draws, and the organization and accessibility of the data. -Isms New -isms became prominent from the 1950s onwards: modernism, postmodernism, deconstructionism, feminism and receptionism being five of the most important for our subject. The modernist trend emerged in the

in The Debate on the English Reformation
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Mairi Cowan

about through a combination of lay-led initiatives and elite-driven repressions, and are best appreciated when Scotland is considered within the context of the broader and deeper early modern currents of change in Europe. To put it another way, the ‘reformatioun’ for which David Lyndsay longed is not something historians should seek within medieval developments or Protestant trends, but in the Catholic

in Death, life, and religious change in Scottish towns, c.1350–1560
John Privilege

an orthodoxy based on tradition rather than definition. No public statement was issued. Rather, the Congregations pursued a policy of silent censure and condemnation.In 1894,M.D.Leroy’s Evolution des espèces was condemned by the Index at the instigation of the Jesuit newspaper La Civilta Cattolica. The paper had been founded in the 1850s by Pius IX and, since the publication of Origin of Species, had fought a running battle with evolutionists in Europe and America. Leroy’s work was found to be in error but the Index resisted issuing a public definition of orthodoxy

in Michael Logue and the Catholic Church in Ireland, 1879–1925
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‘This is your hour’
John Carter Wood

Then Jesus said unto the chief priests, and captains of the temple, and the elders, which were come to him, Be ye come out, as against a thief, with swords and staves? When I was daily with you in the temple, ye stretched forth no hands against me: but this is your hour, and the power of darkness. Luke 22:52–3 In the foreboding political atmosphere of late 1930s Europe

in This is your hour
John Carter Wood

Faith’s social meaning had to be actively discovered . Murry saw the Moot as agreeing that ‘the Christian mind’ was ‘something which is created (or more truly re-created ) in us by our knowledge of reality’. 2 Gilbert Shaw urged a ‘rebirth’ of social Christianity rather than a recovery of earlier models (such as ‘medievalism’). 3 Europe awaited, a CNL essay insisted, ‘a new Reformation’. 4 Oldham saw the CNL ’s mission as ‘to define a faith and purpose’, combining ‘new’ aspects with rediscovered ‘lost’ ones. 5 Mannheim also saw a need to ‘re-state’ the faith

in This is your hour
Keeping the crusades up to date
Christopher Tyerman

could combine together in new syntheses. Nonetheless, the most striking feature of post-Enlightenment 95 THE DEBATE ON THE CRUSADES investigation of the crusades was, as von Sybel had hinted, a willingness to marry the crusades to contemporary obsessions and experience. Just as the Reformation had done, so the French and Industrial Revolutions fundamentally recast debates and understanding of crusading’s nature and significance. The crusades could be regarded as the antithesis of modernism, whether that was considered good or bad, matching an astonishing range of

in The Debate on the Crusades
Ulrike Ehret

the servile state, the damage of corruption in politics, and the role of the Catholic Church as the Mother of European civilisation. . . . I hope that his books will be read and pondered for years to come for they are the writings of a great European, a great Christian and scholar.5 Some writers adopted individual aspects of Belloc’s thoughts, while others identified widely with his worldview. Canon William Barry was one of those who agreed in many ways with Belloc. Barry grew up in London’s East End as the son of Irish immigrants and later became Canon of St Chad

in Church, nation and race
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John Carter Wood

occupied Europe. Communications were easier with the USA, such as with Niebuhr’s Christianity and Crisis , which acted as a partner to The Christian News-Letter . These Christian efforts took place in an even wider media context. Christian newspapers and journals of course addressed religious viewpoints on the war and society, but so did more secular media. The Times and the Manchester Guardian regularly carried statements by senior clergy and gave Christian views on the war and post-war rebuilding. (A prominent joint statement by

in This is your hour
Beyond ‘ghettos’ and ‘golden ages’
Alana Harris

have left behind the ghetto complexes of a poor and largely immigrant community.8 Calling for a reappraisal of its place in a Britain where ‘people … have to see themselves and think of themselves increasingly as European’, the leader adjudged: It must be said that each of the three great streams which have made the English Catholic river of today has had its special inhibitions; the old Catholics had learnt a tradition of reticence, the Irish Catholics a tradition of belligerence, and the converts a tradition of avowed and sharp controversy: and the approach called

in Faith in the family
Christopher Tyerman

, Riant’s elite Société de l’Orient Latin. In keeping with modern academic fashion, since 2002 the society has had its own niche journal, Crusades. After two centuries of academic debate, this raft of modern scholarship challenged certain traditional perceptions of the crusades and crusading, not least regarding the nature of the phenomenon itself. Erdmann’s attempt at definition had merely added diversity rather than clarity. These issues caught a historiographical moment, exposing divergent perceptions as to how medieval Europe worked, how medieval evidence could be

in The Debate on the Crusades