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Abstract only
Stacey Gutkowski

ambiguities within discourses which resist them. Notably, the method of this study was phenomenological. It aims to unpack the range of ‘what it feels like’ – not to quantify Islamophobia, Orientalism, racism or their lack among hiloni millennials. The first part of the chapter provides context. It analyses how the Jewish-Israeli public reads Hamas, Islamic Jihad, Hezbollah and Iran through the lens of the long historical experience of Jews with anti-Semitism in Europe and the Middle East. Stereotypes of Islamic fanaticism emerged in their contemporary form in Israel in

in Religion, war and Israel’s secular millennials
Stacey Gutkowski

theories of secularism and secularization generally ignored Judaism. 28 The ignoring was mutual. Prior to the 1990s, historians, philosophers and religious studies scholars of Jewish cases did not widely engage theories of the secular, seeing them as conceptually inapplicable. 29 However, since the early modern period, Jewish thinkers have engaged extensively with questions raised by European modernism, including about ontology, identity, ethics and politics. In the introduction to their 2015 edited collection, Secularism in Question: Jews and Judaism in Modern Times

in Religion, war and Israel’s secular millennials
Abstract only
Allyn Fives

instantiations in which history endows it with meaning. (Stullerova 2014 , p. 24, p. 33) Yes, putting cruelty first has universal purchase , the argument goes, as it is a philosophical statement. But Shklar is also assuming that cruelty can be examined only in ways that do depend on situational specifics . Some maintain that, for these reasons, Shklar's work has affinities with the post-modernism of Richard Rorty, given that both emphasise our worst experiences and also their historically

in Judith Shklar and the liberalism of fear
Open Access (free)
An epilogue
Saurabh Dube

imaginary but palpable distended and aggrandizing West/Europe as modernity – for all those awaiting its second coming in prior places, anachronistic spaces, lagging in time. In artistic, intellectual, and aesthetic arenas, modernism(s) in South Asia have variously, often critically, engaged with these projections and presuppositions: but they have also been unable to easily escape

in Subjects of modernity
Prisoners of the past
Author: Richard Jobson

This book examines the impact that nostalgia has had on the Labour Party’s political development since 1951. In contrast to existing studies that have emphasised the role played by modernity, it argues that nostalgia has defined Labour’s identity and determined the party’s trajectory over time. It outlines how Labour, at both an elite and a grassroots level, has been and remains heavily influenced by a nostalgic commitment to an era of heroic male industrial working-class struggle. This commitment has hindered policy discussion, determined the form that the modernisation process has taken and shaped internal conflict and cohesion. More broadly, Labour’s emotional attachment to the past has made it difficult for the party to adjust to the socioeconomic changes that have taken place in Britain. In short, nostalgia has frequently left the party out of touch with the modern world. In this way, this book offers an assessment of Labour’s failures to adapt to the changing nature and demands of post-war Britain.

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Modernity, welfare state and Eutopia
Shivdeep Grewal

‘Flow and boundary’ – a suggestive image for a new constellation of border crossings. (Habermas, 2001 ) 1 From its conception to the referenda of 2005 where it met its end, German philosopher Jürgen Habermas wrote in support of the European Constitution. An account of his efforts must, however, be more than a catalogue of texts. For his status as the last of the great system builders of European philosophy, comparable with Hegel in the breadth and explanatory power of his thought

in Habermas and European integration
Peter J. Verovšek

, ‘ Public Discourse and Cosmopolitan Political Identity: Imagining the European Union Citizen ,’ Futures , 38 ( 2006 ), 139 . By stifling imagination and the ability to fantasise [ Phantasie ], which is crucial to creating new structures that go beyond the nation-state, the EU is dooming its own project. 30 S. Benhabib , The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt ( Lanham : Rowman & Littlefield , 2003 ), xliv ; H. Arendt , ‘ Approaching the German Question ,’ in Jerome Kohn (ed), Essays in Understanding, 1930–1954 ( New York : Harcourt, Brace & Co

in Memory and the future of Europe
Open Access (free)
Antinomies and enticements
Saurabh Dube

that the developmental idea of a supersession of the past is crucial to modern imaginaries. This is true of academic assumption and everyday understanding, and also underlies the mutual articulations of modernity, modernization, and modernism. Such splitting of the past from the present is simultaneously temporal and spatial. Here the singular temporal trajectory and the exclusive spatial location of

in Subjects of modernity
Perspectives on civilisation in Latin America
Jeremy C.A. Smith

expressed in history, others would continue shortly after in the modernist arts, literature, poetry, music and philosophy. A second wave of radical modernism emerged in Marxist politics, political economy, liberation theology and indigenous movements. 153 Engagement in the cross-currents of history 153 Modernism arose at the turn of the twentieth century as a movement of artists, philosophers, writers, poets, musicians and activists (Schelling, 2000). In a short time, they remedied the positivist cultures that had denigrated Latin America and venerated European

in Debating civilisations
Peter J. Verovšek

, Essays in Understanding , 391; also Benhabib, The Reluctant Modernism of Hannah Arendt , 86–95. For more on the connection between Arendt and Habermas, see P. J. Verovšek , ‘ A Case of Communicative Learning: Rereading Habermas’s Philosophical Project through an Arendtian Lens ,’ Polity , 51 : 3 ( 2019 ), 597 –627 . 22 Frank, Constituent Moments , ch. 1. 23 Verovšek, ‘Unexpected Support for European Integration,’ 389–413. 24 H. Arendt , On Revolution ( New York : Penguin Classics , 1990 ), 204 . 25 S. Benhabib , ‘ Democratic Exclusions and

in Memory and the future of Europe