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Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

(then imposed by the National Health Service Act 1977) to promote a comprehensive health service and to provide hospital accommodation and facilities for orthopaedic surgery. The patients alleged: (1) that their period on the waiting list was longer than was medically advisable, and (2) that their wait resulted from a shortage of facilities, caused in part by a decision not to build a new hospital block on the grounds of cost. The patients asked for an order compelling the minister to act, and for compensation for their pain and suffering. The Court of Appeal 161

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Daniel F. Herrmann

four kids carry spades and planting tools. While the couple seem to give their blessings to one of the children, the others patiently wait, standing next to or sitting on a trolley that carries their fertile payload. The little tree reveals its fruit only at the second glance: the branches sprout male and female genitalia, deadpan and hilarious symbols of personal liberty and

in Perspectives on contemporary printmaking
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Peter John, Sarah Cotterill, Alice Moseley, Liz Richardson, Graham Smith, Gerry Stoker, and Corinne Wales

variation across the 4 countries of the UK, ranging from 37 per cent in England to 46 per cent in Scotland (NHS Blood and Transplant 2018 ). The overall number of donors, while showing a significant improvement over a ten-year period, still falls short of the level needed to secure enough organs, with over 6,000 people waiting for transplants in 2018. In the US, another opt-in system, 54 per cent of the population were registered in 2017, with 114,000 people on the waiting list (US Department of Health and Human Services 2018). There is a gap between demand for organs

in Nudge, nudge, think, think (second edition)
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The House of Commons
Bill Jones

been extended to every adult male citizen; women had to wait until 1928 for the vote to be given to them on the same terms as men. Some (but by no means all) historians have perceived the mid-nineteenth century as marking the beginning of a ‘golden age’ of Parliament, characterised by a small electorate, loose party discipline and MPs with independent means. Debates actually determined votes and, as Mackintosh remarked: The House sacked Cabinets, it removed individual ministers, it forced the government to disclose information, it set up select committees to

in British politics today
Bill Jones

latter are striving hard to improve this situation. The general election of 7 May 2005 Voting behaviour is essentially about elections and as the most important are the general elections, what follows is a brief analysis of the 2005 one (the most recent at the time of writing). The battleground Blair wanted to win a third term for Labour and, despite his promise that he would go before the end of that term, it was generally expected he would not wait that long. For the Tories, under the experienced and professional Michael Howard (though tainted by association

in British politics today
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Peter John, Sarah Cotterill, Alice Moseley, Liz Richardson, Graham Smith, Gerry Stoker, and Corinne Wales

Government Committee 2013 , Copus 2014 ). While the experiments and other research in this volume suggest there is untapped citizen potential, this can be hard to realize from the ways in which institutions frame the debate, how they create structures, and how they respond to citizens. Examples from everyday life are easy to come by: citizens can see where institutions promise choice and quality in public services but deliver long waits in doctors’ waiting rooms, where their questions about rapidly changing populations have been suppressed, where they are asked

in Nudge, nudge, think, think (second edition)
Andrew Monaghan

of power, the means through which the leadership attempts to implement its policies and therefore the heart of Russian strategy, is often dysfunctional and only really works when it is micro-managed by the top leadership in what is known as ‘manual control’. Russian observers have suggested that this need for manual control ‘permeates all branches of government’, that ministers and governors will not act until the president himself ‘leads them by the nose’ to the problem, mayors and district heads wait for instructions from governors and so on. 36 Notes 1 R

in Power in modern Russia
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh, and Eimear Spain

within the Criminal Courts of Justice in Dublin and waiting rooms are available in ‘almost all refurbished courthouses and also in a number of other courthouses’ (Ibid.). The Victims Charter also contains a commitment that ‘rooms will be set aside for victims in all future refurbishment projects’ (Ibid.). These assurances are mandated by Article 19 of the EU Directive on Victims’ Rights. Interpretation services are also available by order of the court for witnesses who do not speak English to aid them in giving evidence or making a victim impact statement (Victims of

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
Shane Kilcommins, Susan Leahy, Kathleen Moore Walsh, and Eimear Spain

significantly increase the demands on such services, and there will be associated funding demands. Funding for training of police officers, court staff, judges and prosecutors is also vital if the experience of victims of crime when they engage with the criminal justice system is to be improved. Capital investment will also be required in the coming years to provide further equipment for video-links and recording and separate waiting areas. Worryingly, in the Regulatory Impact Analysis of the General Scheme of the Victims of Crime Bill, which aims to transpose the Directive

in The victim in the Irish criminal process
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Jack Holland

that directly raises the question of when to rise up and resist, at a time when the ‘Me Too’ movement is urging, ‘Time’s up’. 25 As Aunt Lydia warns while comforting Offred, ‘this may not seem ordinary to you now, but after a time it will’. 26 How long do you, the viewer, wait, as the political waters begin to boil? The show’s trailer was explicit, with the lead Offred (Elisabeth Moss) recounting: I was asleep before. That’s how we let it happen. When they slaughtered Congress, we didn’t wake up. When they blamed terrorists and suspended the constitution, we

in Fictional television and American Politics