Gordon Pirie

Leo Amery sought out neutral ground in the proceedings by endorsing the potential of aviation and listing ways in which aeroplanes might help unify and develop the Empire. William Courtenay, the aviation impresario, recalled that it was in the mid-1920s when Sir Alan Cobham was grabbing news headlines that he learnt most about the geography of the Empire. Making propaganda for and from Empire aviation did not come easily to British people renowned for their reserve. After the Imperial Conference, Sir Samuel Hoare indicated that Imperial Airways would in future play a role more in keeping with its name: it would ply Empire routes in addition to European routes. Hoare drew attention to civil-aviation progress and prospects in the Empire wherever and whenever he could. In the company of Sefton Brancker he attended the May 1927 Colonial Conference in London.

in Air empire
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Gordon Pirie

Far from being disembodied machinists, private pilots who dashed about the Empire were social creatures. Their individual characters and dispositions were unique, of course, but they were all moulded in late imperial times and traditions. Before Amy Johnson and Jean Batten, the most prominent British women who flew across the Empire were the Duchess of Bedford, Lady Bailey and Lady Heath. A violent thunderstorm between Dodoma and Juba obliged the Duchess's party to land on the Imperial Airways emergency air field at Nimule. Lady Bailey admired French air initiatives in West Africa, and was generally grateful for hospitality in French-speaking Africa. Lady Heath started out from Cape Town for London in February 1928. Before beginning her 6,150 mile flight in a light plane, she gave lectures and flying exhibitions, and helped to arrange an air race in South Africa.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
Gordon Pirie

Passenger fares on Imperial's single-class services clearly played a role in determining who flew, and how flying served and projected Empire. Imperial Airways kept statistical records fastidiously. Flight incident reports show men out numbering women on Imperial's long-haul flights, but the ratios were not static. British women passengers were generally given only vague identity if they were unmarried. Foreign royalty were among the most celebrated passengers in the publicity Imperial gave to celebrity passengers. The Indian air route had its share of notable passengers. The Vicereine flew back to India on Imperial after four months' home leave in 1933. Professionals with other paid careers also used Imperial Airways to move about. Surgeons, scientists and scholars were among the first converts to commercial air transport. People connected with Imperial Airways and those conducting aviation negotiations or doing airline business also travelled about the Empire by air.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

An informative account of an Imperial flight by an inexperienced air traveller appeared in the Field in the summer of 1935. An Imperial ticket bought some comfort and security, but not lightning speed. The Imperial Airways Chairman, Sir Eric Geddes, was adamant that speed was a secondary consideration for many Empire travellers. Air services were beginning to choreograph imperialism, especially in places not yet touched by mechanised land transport. In 1932, a disillusioned South African reckoned that Imperial was unlikely to have its passenger contract renewed in Central and Southern Africa. Whimsy percolated an article published in 1939 in the Journal of the Royal African Society about 'the romance' of the air mail to Africa. Like the African airway, the new air route to India was an irresistible subject for writers.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

The image of Imperial Airways as an organisation, and its iconic status in the Empire, hinged partly on its perceived efficiency and reliability, and partly on the impression created by its senior management. Indeed, Empire aviation traced the tiers, ceilings and colours of transport work in colonial shipping and railways. Promoters of Empire aviation, knowledgeable commentators and enthusiastic air travellers used maritime metaphors avidly. When the Empire-class flying boats entered service, Imperial instituted a new category of cabin crew to manage paperwork that included recording passenger and passport details, checking manifests of luggage, mail and freight, and handling customs documentation. British ground crews and support staff scattered around the Empire's airfields were probably reminded often about being representatives of their home country and its culture. Flagged aeroplanes and their flying crew came and went often, but ground personnel were more rooted.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

Making the public 'airminded' was certainly part of deliberate acculturation in late imperial Britain. In view of the relatively few people who did fly on Empire services, advertising the new airway to and from Empire may have burnished imperial sympathies more than it boosted Imperial revenues. In the mid 1930s, once the Empire air routes and services had acquired better definition, Imperial's advertising increased. 'Speedbird', the name given to the new signifier of Empire aviation, appeared on posters, tickets, advertisements, luggage tags, stationery and aircraft fuselages from 1932. A lot of Imperial Airways advertising was on its own account, but the airline and the imperial spirit benefited by a considerable amount of free publicity. In the autumn of 1934, Imperial Airways and The Times banded together to mount an exhibition entitled 'Flying over the Empire'.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

Pilots, politicians and propagandists all publicised the possibility and desirability of imperial flying. British newspapers and magazines, several radio broadcasts, and vigorous book publishing for children and adults contributed accounts about imperial aviation and flying experiences. The encyclopaedic Air Annual of the British Empire represented specialised serial publishing about Empire aviation most voluminously. The world air route maps published periodically in The Times and in Aeroplane and Flight, as well as in aeronautical books, transmitted a powerful message about tenancy of the sky and about imperial communications. In the early 1930s the market for books about British aviation appeared inexhaustible. The BBC's Radio Times billed the programme as a sound-panorama of the development of flight since the Middle Ages. Empire air transport reappeared on the National Service in 1938 as part of a series of four radio programmes entitled 'Lines on the Map'.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

The actuality of imperial flying never quite reached the pitch that was hoped, and a great deal of the service anticipated from Empire aviation in the inter-war period was to reside forever in inter-war imaginings. After Empire flying ceased, the mass media continued as a medium of sporadic and partial recall of the thick confection of Empire aviation. Intriguing personal recollections of imperial air travel emerged in the BBC's 1979 television series that drew on one social history text and generated another. Alfred Hitchcock followed with his 1940 film 'Foreign Correspondent'. It featured a full-scale mock-up of an Imperial Airways Empire flying boat In the 1980s, an icon of Empire aviation was used to brand a popular merchandising incentive and customer loyalty scheme in Britain.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

In the twilight of the British Empire, flying imperially was one last expression of the reach of British overseas ambition and style. By securing administrative, cultural and trade ties in the Empire, flying also had a politico-strategic purpose. Moreover, for Imperial Airways passengers, and for private purchasers of British light aircraft, flying imperially was also patriotic. Flying imperially was an experience, an expression and always partly an act of imagination. The dreams began after the First World War. Demobbed airforce pilots sought new victories, frontiers and exhilaration by flying first, furthest, fastest or highest. The business of creating an imperial air passenger market in the 1930s drew heavily on selling novelty, sensation and status. Aviation may not have prolonged Britain's historically maritime Empire, but it did give imperialism new dimensions, meanings and significance.

in Cultures and caricatures of British imperial aviation
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Gordon Pirie

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book describes the differentiated roots, channels and instruments of imperialism. It examines the sources and strains of Empire aviation. The book explores the paternalism, polemic, posturing, symbolism and spectacle surrounding the planning and performance of imperial aviation. British military aviation played its part by surveying and testing long-distance air routes that could be used for defending the Empire as well as for civil purposes in the Middle East, India and Africa. Aviation became the new imperial heroic; brave, dashing pilots became icons and were invested as the new Knights of the British Empire. The grandly titled Imperial Airways company was established as the 'chosen instrument' of organised Empire civil aviation in 1924. Facets of British imperial civil aviation history have gradually been tackled in a manner that veers away from bland narrative.

in Air empire