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Monstrous marriage, maternity, and the politics of embodiment
Carol Margaret Davison

In view of Scotland’s featured role in Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein as the site of the female monster’s creation, in combination with the popular stereotype of Scotland as a site of gender subversion inhabited by putatively transgressive, intellectual, and authoritative female ‘monsters’ both imaginary (Lady Macbeth) and real (Mary Queen of Scots), this essay examines how and with what implications Frankenstein was granted new life in Scottish literature of the 1980s and beyond.  In works by Liz Lochhead, Iain Banks, Alasdair Gray, and Janice Galloway, written in the wake of Second-Wave feminism and the aftermath of the failed Scottish Referendum of 1979, when Scotland witnessed an exciting cultural renaissance that continues into the present day, writers reconfigured Frankenstein to take up questions of maternity, modernity, gender roles and relations, and national identity.

in Adapting Frankenstein
Contesting the ‘Female Gothic’ in Charlotte Dacre‘s Zofloya
Carol Margaret Davison

Taking Charlotte Dacre‘s unique and controversial novel, Zofloya; Or The Moor (1806), as its focal point, this essay takes stock of the strengths and limitations of the major theoretical engagements with the ‘Female Gothic’ under its diverse appellations, and consider them in terms of the history of Gothic theory more generally.

Gothic Studies
A Mad Tango
Carol Margaret Davison

Gothic Studies
Theorizing the Nineteenth-Century Gothic Pharmography
Carol Margaret Davison

Liberty, a term dear to the Enlightenments emancipatory project, has long been a key concept in the Gothic. No branch of the Gothic more powerfully or creatively examines the complexities of the liberty question than the Gothic pharmography – a narrative chronicling drug/alcohol seduction and addiction. Drawing on three novelistic sub-genres – the Oriental tale, the imperial Gothic, and the Urban Gothic – the Gothic pharmography coalesces several distinct nineteenth-century debates – the nature of the will and liberal individualism; social oppression and conformity; urban and national degeneration; and British imperialist expansion, which involved the perceived anxiety-inducing sense of Britains growing economic dependence on the non-Western world. This essay offers an overview of the Gothic pharmography from the late eighteenth century through to the fin de siècle in Marie Corelli‘s Wormwood.

Gothic Studies
Abstract only
Anne Williams, Jeffrey Cass, Carol Margaret Davison, Diane Long Hoeveler, James Allard, Helen Roulston, John Vance, Martin Willis, and Sue Zlosnik

Gothic Studies