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Benjamin Fisher

Elsewhere, but always subsumed within more general issues, I have argued for paying more attention to the Gothicism in the writings of James Kirke Paulding, whose literary career spanned the first half of the nineteenth century. He is one of those American writers who, like murder, will out, despite more neglect than his accomplishments deserve. By 1830 - to cite but one example of Paulding‘s significance - when Hawthorne and Poe were still apprentices in the craft of short fiction, a span of years had passed during which Paulding‘s productions in this genre clearly justified such labels as ‘the Paulding decade of the short story’ (Amos L. Herold‘s designation). Harold E. Hall, moreover, ranks ‘Cobus Yerks and ‘The Dumb Girl’, two Paulding tales from this period, among the finest early nineteenth-century American short stories. Although personal and career necessities often drew him away from literary pursuits, Paulding should by no means be ignored; his name keeps surfacing, particularly when the topic is literary nationalism, as Benjamin T. Spencer, John Seelye, Michael John McDonough, and I have already indicated. Paulding is also remembered as a pioneer in presenting frontier life in fiction and for his early essays in what we now term Southwestern Humor.1

Gothic Studies
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Poe and the Gothic
Benjamin Fisher

Gothic Studies
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Benjamin Fisher, Jodey Castricano, Tim Youngs, Colin Edwards, Neil Cornwell, Lisa Hopkins, and Richard Fusco

Gothic Studies
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Frances Chiu, Diane Long Hoeveller, Charles Crow, Elizabeth Way, Nicole Reynolds, Benjamin Fisher, Anne Williams, Ana González-Rivas Fernández, and Marie Mulvey-Roberts

Gothic Studies