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007, Ian Fleming and Playboy magazine
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The Playboy magazine has always reminded its readership of the Playboy-Bond connection by commenting on its longevity and significance, especially in relation to times past. Among other things that James Bond and Playboy have in common is the fact that they are both strongly associated with the sixties. They were launched at about the same time in 1953, and are still around. This book is primarily organised around the story of the relationship between them, played out in popular culture as part of wider cultural relations. Though the chapters outline the emergence of the Playboy-Bond relationship, they also draw on relevant historical and theoretical concerns. The research presented focuses on the public version of the Playboy-Bond relationship as mediated by Bond and Playboy magazine and evident within the shifting realms of culture and the media. It also discusses how the close relationship between Ian Fleming and Playboy was publicised in print with some form of commentary. How Fleming and the Bond novels endorsed Playboy, and how Playboy endorsed Ian Fleming and Bond novels, against the backdrop of American popular culture, is discussed. After discussing Connery's Bond, the book presents some illustrative examples of this connection, especially in terms of consumer preferences, style and taste. It draws together arguments on male fantasy of 'strategic and selective "liberation" of women in order to discuss the women in Bond and Playboy. Finally, the book considers how the two remain interconnected, and as long-standing cultural icons representing the playboy lifestyle fantasy.

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Claire Hines

This introduction presents an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book is primarily organised around the story of the relationship between James Bond and Playboy, played out in popular culture as part of wider cultural relations, especially in the sixties. It deals with the first phase in the formal relationship between Playboy and Ian Fleming and the Bond novels, which began around 1960 and was overtaken by the second phase in the mid-1960s. The book examines how particular aspects of Sean Connery's Bond resemble the Playboy fantasy of individualism, social mobility and the work-leisure relationship, which was not without its contradictions and paradoxes. It talks about the similarities between the lifestyle habits and style of Playboy magazine and James Bond within the essential context of male consumerism.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

It has been well noted by a number of scholars that 1953 coincidentally marked both the publication of the first James Bond novel by Ian Fleming in Britain and the launch of Playboy magazine in America by Hugh Hefner. Between 1953 and 1960, before the film franchise with Sean Connery in the role of James Bond, Fleming wrote and had published seven out of a total fourteen Bond books at the rate of one per year, starting with Casino Royale. This chapter draws upon existing scholarship on Playboy and Bond to look beyond chance, to explain that the Playboy-Bond relationship has its origins in the 1950s, setting up the historical and generic contexts. Moving from the spy genre to the genre of men's magazines, most observers agree that Playboy began by updating and repackaging elements of the basic formula of Esquire.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

Playboy has claimed the honour of having been the first American magazine to publish a Bond story. This chapter considers how Ian Fleming and the Bond novels endorsed Playboy, and how Playboy endorsed Fleming and Bond novels, against the backdrop of James Bond's introduction into American popular culture. Significantly, these acts of endorsement predated the first cycle of Bond films in the 1960s, but soon developed to include Sean Connery's screen incarnation when the film series became popular with cinema audiences worldwide. In the early 1960s though, it is significant that Playboy favoured Fleming as much as Bond, and the author of the Bond thrillers was presented as a literary celebrity and pen friend of Playboy until after his death in 1964. From the first Playboy issue, Hugh Hefner regarded literary fiction as important to the upscale concept of his new magazine for men.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

This chapter introduces how Playboy endorsed Sean Connery's Bond as a contemporary role model both on and beyond the screen, and as an iconic embodiment of the playboy fantasy ideal that was being readily imagined. Playboy gave some biographical detail on Connery, including his early life and background. Playboy had made only a few direct mentions of the Bond films, having focused mainly on developing a relationship with Ian Fleming and the literary Bond. Playboy championed the ideology of masculine individualism in all spheres of life, including work. An intertextual aspect of the screen Bond that the 1965 'Playboy Interview' with Connery picked up on is connected to the wider themes of social mobility and leisure. Despite some of its other criticisms, Playboy had praised from the outset Connery's screen portrayal of the Bond character.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

The most obvious connection between James Bond and Playboy is the lifestyle that can be contextualised within the ascendance of male consumerism in 1960s Britain and America. This chapter sets out to discuss some illustrative examples of the connection between James Bond and Playboy in the decade and a half after they were created, especially in terms of consumer preferences, style and taste. The playboy ideal was inseparable from consumerism and commodity consumption, where consumerism and attention to the details of high-tech gadgetry, dining, drinking, travel, fashion and appearance were the means to attain elements of the fantasy lifestyle portrayed by the likes of Playboy and Bond. Additionally, in anticipation of the release of You Only Live Twice, a later version of this advert carried a note that Sean Connery was starring in the upcoming fifth Bond film.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

If the character of James Bond was the kind of man that many men supposedly wanted to be in the 1960s, by all accounts men longed for the beautiful women that he meets. This chapter discusses the women in Bond and Playboy. It notes that the Playmate and the Bond girl share some common characteristics, and examines Playboy's coverage of the women of Bond, closely analysing the November 1965 'James Bond's Girls' pictorial. The chapter concludes by returning to reflect on the function of the representations of women in Playboy and Bond in the 1960s in relation to the requirements of male sexuality, and the playboy ideal. Playboy magazine is perhaps best known for the Playmate. In the early years of Playboy, to develop the Playmate centrefold Hugh Hefner made some important changes to the standard presentation of the female pin-ups in other men's magazines.

in The playboy and James Bond
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Claire Hines

Playboy magazine has maintained some strong connections to James Bond, albeit in changing cultural circumstances, since the November 1965 issue. Though the social and cultural landscape of Britain and America has changed dramatically since the sixties, the use of the Bond and Playboy formulas has largely endured. This chapter picks up the historical thread at the point of the mid-1960s, and aspects of the Playboy-Bond relationship, in order to revisit and extend these insights into the years afterwards. It considers how Bond and Playboy remain interconnected both periodically in the formal sense, and as long-standing cultural icons representing the playboy lifestyle fantasy. This has been achieved with varying degrees of success over the years through, among other things, humour, affection and nostalgia as a means of (re)negotiating the past and the ongoing cultural associations of the playboy.

in The playboy and James Bond