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In a long and varied career, Lindsay Anderson made training films, documentaries, searing family dramas and blistering satires, including This Sporting Life, O Lucky Man! and Britannia Hospital. This book is about a director whose work came to public attention with Free Cinema but who, unlike many of his peers in that movement did not take the Hollywood route to success. What emerges is a strong feeling for the character of the man as well as for a remarkable career in British cinema. Making use of hitherto unseen original materials from Anderson's extensive personal and professional records, this book is valuable as a study of how the films came about: the production problems involved, the collaborative input of others, as well as the completed films' promotion and reception. It also offers a finely argued take on the whole issue of film authorship. It prompts renewed respect for the man and the artist and a desire to watch the films all over again.

John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

This chapter discusses Lindsay Anderson's understanding of authorship as expressed through his critical writings. It analyses how each of his films reveal both his authorship as a practitioner including his reflections on his work.

in Lindsay Anderson
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Lindsay Anderson’s private writing
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

This chapter examines Lindsay Anderson's diaries, private writings documenting his reflections on his own personality, his colleagues, friends, family and his sexuality. His journals echo his lamentations over the absence of love in his life and the impossibility of finding it. They also recorded details of his travels with the Army and his visit to Vienna.

in Lindsay Anderson
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John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

This chapter discusses the early films of Lindsay Anderson for Richard Sutcliffe Ltd. These films include Meet the Pioneers, Idlers that Work, Three Installations and Trunk Conveyor. In addition to episodes of Robin Hood for television, Anderson also wrote and directed a twenty-minute film Foot and Mouth made for the Ministry of Agriculture during the 1955 epidemic. Anderson also directed films influenced by Humphrey Jennings. These films include Wakefield Express (1952), Thursday's Children (1953), O Dreamland (1953) and Every Day Except Christmas (1957).

in Lindsay Anderson
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

This Sporting Life is the first feature film of Lindsay Anderson. Anderson had been impressed by David Storey's novel This Sporting Life and wanted to direct the film himself. This chapter considers the claims to authorship and production of This Sporting Life. Storey adapted his own deeply personal novel and the resultant film script was the first collaboration between Storey and Anderson.

in Lindsay Anderson
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

This chapter discusses two films written and directed by Anderson: The White Bus (1966) and Raz Dwa Trzy or The Singing Lesson (1967). The White Bus is a short film based on a story by Shelagh Delaney. It is about a girl returning from London to visit her hometown in the North of England. The idea of the The Singing Lesson is based on Professor Sempolinski working with students on the presentation of songs and musical numbers.

in Lindsay Anderson
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John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

The film If.... (1968) is about three senior boys, Mick Travis as the charismatic leader and Johnny and Wallace as his willing accomplices. As cadet soldiers, the three friends mutinied and killed their commanding officer, a sadistic teacher who abuses junior boys. This chapter discusses Anderson's autobiographical contributions to the film's script, the film's production and promotion, and the critical success of the film.

in Lindsay Anderson
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John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

Lindsay Anderson referred to O Lucky Man! as his auteur production. This chapter discusses the film's principal themes, Anderson's authorial input, the film's publicity and release in North America and the critical reception of the film.

in Lindsay Anderson
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

In Celebration was a claustrophobic family drama written by David Storey and directed by Lindsay Anderson. The play took place at the Royal Court Theatre in 1969 where production received widespread critical acclaim. This chapter discusses the production of the film In Celebration in 1974 and the partnership of Lindsay and David Storey. It also discusses the film's release in North America and the critical reception of the film after its release in 1976.

in Lindsay Anderson
John Izod, Karl Magee, Kathryn Hannan and Isabelle Gourdin-Sangouard

The Old Crowd was one of the six plays written by Alan Bennett for London Weekend Television. This chapter discusses the collaboration of Bennet and Lindsay Anderson in the adaptation of The Old Crowd into film. It also discusses the promotion of the film, the critical reaction of viewers and Anderson's reactions to the critics.

in Lindsay Anderson