Abstract only

Series:

Edited by: John Cunningham

This collection offers important new insights across a broad range of topics relating to medicine in Early Modern Ireland. Of particular note is the substantial attention devoted to the years before 1750, a period that has been relatively neglected in studies of Irish medicine. The book brings together an exciting selection of established scholars, such as Peter Elmer and Clodagh Tait, as well as a number of early career historians. Their work effectively situates Irish medicine in relation to long-term social and cultural change on the island, as well as to appropriate international contexts, encompassing Britain, Europe and the Atlantic World. The chapters also engage in various ways with important aspects of the historiography of medicine in the twenty-first century. Among the key subjects addressed by the contributors are Gaelic medicine, warfare, the impact of new medical ideas, migration, patterns of disease, midwifery and childbirth, book collecting, natural history, and urban medicine. A common thread running through the chapters is the focus on medical practitioners. The book accordingly enables significant new understanding of the character of medical practise in Early Modern Ireland. This collection will be of interest to academics and students of the history of Early Modern medicine. It also contains much that will be essential reading for historians of Ireland.

Abstract only

John Cunningham

Established by veteran Trotskyists, the Militant Tendency emerged in Britain in 1964. As other elements of Trotskyism oriented themselves to students and the youth counterculture, Militant remained 'traditional' in approach, agitating in trade unions and directing its members to join the Labour Party, with a view to influencing that party and the unions affiliated to it. In 1972, Militant secured a foothold in Ireland. An Irish Militant organisation followed which adopted its parent's strategy of 'entrism' in relation to Labour parties, north and south of the Irish border, while publishing a paper which had the same title and typeface as the British publication, and which used its London editorial and printing facilities. This chapter explores the development of Militant in Ireland, and in doing so demonstrates the ideological and practical links between the British and Irish ‘hard’ left, and the challenges that presented to the respective Labour parties in both countries.

Abstract only

John Cunningham

After the British Labour Party adopted the position of favouring Irish unity by consent in 1981, it emphasised the importance of improving Anglo-Irish relations, believing that institutionalising and normalising cross-border co-operation, as well as harmonising the social and economic systems of Northern Ireland and the Republic of Ireland, would diminish the relevance of the border. To examine the implications of that position, this chapter considers Labour’s relationship with the Republic of Ireland between 1981 and 1994, with reference to its bipartisan support for government policy and the developments and debates over its Northern Ireland policy. Labour’s emphasis on improving relations is placed in the wider context of political developments in both countries. The period is also contrasted with the more fractious relationship between the Labour Party and the Republic of Ireland in the 1970s, and the notably improved relationship between the two governments in the 1990s, particularly under the leadership of Tony Blair and Bertie Ahern.

Full text access

Series:

John Cunningham

This chapter explores the medical environment of 1640s Ireland, particularly during the 1641 Rebellion. It uses the 1641 Depositions to explore how people understood reported sickness and disease. It also traces the experiences of a broad range of medics during a period of warfare and significant social and political upheaval. In doing so, it enables an important new perspective on medicine in Early Modern Ireland.

Abstract only

Series:

John Cunningham

The introduction offers an assessment of the current state of the historiography relating to medicine in Early Modern Ireland. It surveys recent work and situates it in relation to international scholarship on the history of medicine. It also provides a brief overview of the contents and main arguments of the chapters that follow.