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Experimental British television
Laura Mulvey

This introduction provides an overview of the key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book primarily addresses the aesthetics of television programmes, charting some key examples of experiment and formal or stylistic innovation, drawing mostly on arts documentaries and drama productions. It introduces Channel 4 with an insider's account of a world of utopian hopes and the snares of the schedule. The book discusses the work of the little known Langham Group. In contrast to the populism of Armchair Theatre, the group emerged from a BBC initiative to consider 'the problem of experimental television programmes'. The book discusses very varied examples of experimental television that flourished during the 1960s. It also introduces Ken Russell's arts documentaries with the observation that, in the 1960s, culture acquired a new centrality in British society and its economy.

in Experimental British television
Editor: Laura Mulvey
Author: Jamie Sexton

This book addresses the aesthetics of British television programmes, charting some key examples of experiment and formal or stylistic innovation, drawing mostly on arts documentaries and drama productions. It turns to the work of the little known Langham Group. In contrast to the populism of Armchair Theatre, the group emerged from a British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) initiative to consider 'the problem of experimental television programmes'. The book discusses very varied examples of experimental television that flourished during the 1960s. It also introduces Channel 4 with an insider's account of a world of utopian hopes and the snares of the schedule. The book then looks at two series that attempted to experiment with the presentation of art to British television viewers: New Tempo and Who Is?. It explores the relationship between the series and Troy Kennedy Martin's 'Nats Go Home' manifesto, a polemic against naturalism in television drama which provided a theoretical rationale for the experimentalism of Diary of a Young Man. The book further examines the product of that experiment, placing it in the context of John McGrath's other work and his own 1979 'manifesto' for progressive television. It argues that Dennis Potter's drama, and particularly The Singing Detective, contributes to experimental television through systematic comment on, and elaboration of, the medium's inherent polysemic nature. Finally, the book focuses on the presentation of pop music on television, specifically the pop promo, rather than the dedicated music television programme.

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Marie Mulvey-Roberts, Nicola Nixon, Susan Allen Ford, Charles Crow, Laura Dabundo, Stacy Gillis, Lisa Hopkins, and Gill Plain

Gothic Studies