This chapter provides an analytical framework for an understanding of peacemaking, set within the academic discourse on the subject. It sets out the historical context within which thinking about peace developed from ancient Greece and Rome to current exponents. It presents key themes important for twenty-first century peacemaking, notably the complex nature of contemporary conflicts and the global nature of the forces exerted on them, root causes, sub and supra state structures and multi-level challenges. It highlights the global character of the twenty-first century peace challenge and the necessity for any response to be cosmopolitian-multicultural, universalist-globalist and focused on accepting diversity and transcending conflict and division through progress on common goals and recognition of common humanity.

in Peacemaking in the twenty-first century

Edited and introduced by Nobel Laureate John Hume, T.G. Fraser and Leonie Murray, this book provides a range of unique insights into the issues surrounding peacemaking, delivered by major international figures with direct experience in this area at the highest level. Based on a series of lectures on the theme of ‘Peace’ given under the auspices of the Tip O’Neill Chair in Peace Studies at the University of Ulster’s Magee campus and funded by The Ireland Funds, each lecture is presented with an introduction placing it in its proper context within the discourse on peacemaking. The volume makes an invaluable contribution to the study of peace and conflict studies, international history, international relations and international politics.