Faïza Guène, Saphia Azzeddine, and Nadia Bouzid, or the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women’s literature

This chapter examines how Faïza Guène, Saphia Azzeddine and Nadia Bouzid exceed the literary confines of appellations such as minority literature, decentered literature, literature of the margins, exile literature, and banlieue literature. It demonstrates how the novels seek 'to be grounded and not simply "deterritorialized" or "deterritorializing" for that matter' in a literary landscape that does not pertain to a minority literature, but to literature at large. In France, areas containing relatively large concentrations of residents of foreign origin are almost always multi-ethnic. The stereotype of the Maghrebi-French family order is revisited to offer readers a totally different view of who Maghrebi-French people are nowadays. Azzeddine replaces exclusionary and confrontational identity politics with fluid cultural and identity positions which are adopted or relinquished according to the circumstances but in any case are not pitted against one another.

in Reimagining North African Immigration
Identities in flux in French literature, television, and film

Christiane Taubira's spirited invocation of colonial poetry at the French National Assembly in 2013 denounced the French politics of assimilation in Guyana . It was seen as an attempt to promote respect for difference, defend the equality of gay and heterosexual rights, and give a voice to silent social and cultural minorities. Taubira's unmatched passion for poetry and social justice, applied to the current Political arena, made her an instant star in the media and on the Internet. This book relates to the mimetic and transformative powers of literature and film. It examines literary works and films that help deflate stereotypes regarding France's post-immigration population, promote a new respect for cultural and ethnic minorities. The writers and filmmakers examined in the book have found new ways to conceptualize the French heritage of immigration from North Africa and to portray the current state of multiculturalism in France. The book opens with Steve Puig's helpful recapitulation of the development of beur, banlieue, and urban literatures, closely related and partly overlapping taxonomies describing the cultural production of second-generation, postcolonial immigrants to France. Discussing the works of three writers, the book discusses the birth of a new Maghrebi-French women's literature. Next comes an examination of how the fictional portrayal of women in Guene's novels differs from the representation of female characters in traditional beur literature. The book also explores the development of Abdellatif Kechiche's cinema, Djaidani's film and fiction, French perception of Maghrebi-French youth, postmemorial immigration, fiction, and postmemory and identity in harki.

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This introduction presents an overview of key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of the book. The book discusses the issues related to the mimetic and transformative powers of literature and film. It examines literary works and films that help deflate stereotypes regarding France's post-immigration population, and promote a new respect for cultural and ethnic minorities. The book highlights the overall renewal of literary and cultural production initiated by post-beur and post-colonial authors with roots in North Africa. It explores a postmemorial methodology intended to correct the foreclosures of French memory through the reading of multiple fictional representations of a significant event of Algerian decolonization. The book demonstrates cinema's potential to rewrite, complement, and fill in the epistemological gaps of the official historical discourse. It describes a new, international type of immigration from the global South caused by a broader form of neo-imperialism.

in Reimagining North African Immigration