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Dethroning And Exiling Indigenous Monarchs Under British And French Colonial Rule, 1815– 1955
Author: Robert Aldrich

The overthrow and exile of Napoleon in 1815 is a familiar episode in modern history, but it is not well known that just a few months later, British colonisers toppled and banished the last king in Ceylon. This book explores confrontations and accommodations between European colonisers and indigenous monarchs. It discusses the displacement of a few among the three dozen 'potentates' by British and French authorities from 1815 until the 1950s. The complicated relationship between the crown of a colonising country and colonial monarchies has often lain in the background of historical research, but relatively seldom appeared in the forefront except in the case of the Indian princely states. The book further examines particular cases of the deposition and exile of rulers: King Sri Vikrama Rajasinha in Ceylon in 1815, Queen Ranavalona of Madagascar in 1897, and Emperors Ham Nghi, Thanh Thai and Duy Tan in Vietnam during 1885-1916. It also provides more composite accounts of Asia and Africa: the British ouster of Indian princes, the last Burmese king and a sultan in Malaya, and then British and French removal of a host of 'chieftains' in sub-Saharan Africa. Finally, the book looks at the French colonial removal of rulers in Algeria, Morocco and Tunisia - and the restoration of a Moroccan sultan on the eve of decolonisation. By the end of the colonial period, in many countries around the globe, monarchism - kingship, had lost its old potency, though it has not disappeared.

Napoléon III and Eugénie in Algeria and beyond
Robert Aldrich

This chapter examines the tours of Napoléon and, on his first visit, Empress Eugénie to Algeria, setting them in the context of the emperor's energetic colonial and international policies. It briefly considers in relation to other travels of the imperial couple and their son, the prince imperial also named Napoléon. The chapter shows the variety of journeys undertaken by members of royal families, including ones deposed from their thrones. It demonstrates the way in which experiences and impressions during a tour, such as Napoléon's brief first visit to Algeria, contributed to the formulation of policy, and how that second tour both revealed and obscured conflicts inherent in colonialism. Napoléon had considered having himself crowned in 1852 as 'King of Algiers' as well as Emperor of the French, but he invested limited effort in Algeria during the first years of his rule.

in Royals on tour
The visits to France of King Sisowath (1906) and Emperor Khai Dinh (1922)
Robert Aldrich

Politicians, the press and the public flocked to see the King of Siam, the paparazzi following his every move, and the politicians discussing the international relations of one of the few Asian countries to escape European colonisation. The king's visit was particularly delicate because of recent armed clashes between the Siamese and the French in Southeast Asia and because of the ambition of some to make Siam a French colony or protectorate. This chapter examines tours by two Southeast Asian monarchs: King Sisowath of Cambodia in 1906, and Emperor Khai Dinh of Annam in 1922. The Vietnamese dynasty, Khai Dinh's son Bao Dai remained in France as a student after the 1922 tour, and returned to Paris after a trip to Hué for his coronation in 1926. The French recruited Vietnamese as soldiers for the European theatre and as labourers in munitions factories and other wartime industries in the metropole.

in Royals on tour
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Sexuality and the writing of colonial history
Robert Aldrich

In 1990, among the first dozen volumes of the Studies in Imperialism series, appeared Ronald Hyam's Empire and Sexuality, a novel and even provocative theme in a field traditionally dominated by theories and practices of colonial governance, the economic balance-sheet of empire and the collaboration and resistance of colonised peoples. Sex had hardly been a topic in imperial history; the establishment of The Journal of the History of Sexuality confirmed the academic legitimacy of the subject. Sexuality and gender appear particularly in terms of the masculine ethos pervading colonialism and the promotion of manly virtues linked to imperial spirit and British patriotism. John MacKenzie himself returned to sexuality in his 1988 volume on hunting, with a theme-packed paragraph reflecting on sexual aspects of the sport. One of the major appearance of sexuality in the Studies in Imperialism series came with Mrinalini Sinha's Colonial Masculinity.

in Writing imperial histories
European colonisers and indigenous monarchs
Robert Aldrich

This chapter demonstrates how the deposition and exile of indigenous monarchs provided a strategy for colonial authorities to establish, consolidate and maintain their domination. It argues that the displacement of those at the pinnacle of native power, often in arbitrary fashion and by duplicitous means, blatantly manifested the strength of colonisers. The dethroning of indigenous sovereigns evidenced the fragility of colonial overlordship. Dethroned European rulers had often lived in cosmopolitan courts and moved about their kingdoms, and outside their lands, in great royal progresses. The chapter focuses on the posthumous life of royal exiles, suggesting that though deposed, dead and buried, they lived on in national memory and commemoration. The 'new imperial history' places emphasis on the lived experiences of those affected by colonialism, the life stories of both the famous and the unknown.

in Banished potentates
The British and Sri Vikrama Rajasinha, 1815
Robert Aldrich

Sri Vikrama Rajasinha and his dynasty out of the way, the British monarchy and its viceregal representatives assumed the place of the Kandy monarchy, while extending royal power over the whole island in a way the Nayakkars never managed. The dramatic circumstances of Vikrama's capture were recounted in a memoir by a British-employed interpreter, William Adrian Dias Bandaranayaka. Vikrama and earlier Kandyan kings indeed used coerced labour, and only after his death was slavery abolished throughout the empire. In the late 1700s and during the revolutionary and Napoleonic wars, Britain and France were embroiled in commercial rivalries and military conflicts that constituted a world war fought in Europe, the Americas and Asia. As the years passed, Britain entrenched itself in Ceylon and India, the world largely ignorant about the captive in Vellore. Revolts, insurrections and conspiracies occurred with regularity in Ceylon from 1817 to 1848.

in Banished potentates
Royal exile in British Asia
Robert Aldrich

Sudha Shah's study has comprehensively traced the fate of the royals in exile, and Amitav Ghosh's novel The Glass Palace provides a fascinating fictionalised portrayal. This chapter begins with an overview of the ouster of Indian 'princes' who were taken as prisoners of war, or deposed on grounds of resistance, maladministration and character defects, from the early 1800s until the 1940s. The nineteenth century saw unparalleled British empire-building in Asia after the consolidation of its position in Ceylon in 1815. When the British invaded Delhi, Bahadur Shah Zafar and his sons took refuge at Hamayun's Tomb, the burial-ground of the Mughal emperor. The chapter examines the overthrow of the last king of Burma following the conquest of Mandalay in 1885. It looks at the removal of a Southeast Asian monarch, the Sultan of Perak in Malaya.

in Banished potentates
The French and three emperors in Vietnam
Robert Aldrich

In the nineteenth century, the French were seeking an outpost in Southeast Asia to compete with the well established British, Dutch and Spanish, and at the end of the 1850s, gunboat diplomacy secured a foothold in Saigon. French occupation of Hué sparked four years of armed resistance in Annam and Tonkin that targeted the foreigners and Vietnamese Christians, the Can Vuong movement. From the emperor's hideout, an imperial edict was issued in Ham Nghi's name and under his seal. French residents of Vietnam appeared little troubled by the tempests. The French nevertheless maintained support for the throne in Hué, though with the sovereign reduced to virtual impotence. The circumstances of the exile of Ham Nghi in the 1880s, Thanh Thai in 1907 and Duy Tan in 1916 illustrate the difficult coexistence of a paramount colonial power and a vassal 'protected' monarchy.

in Banished potentates
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The British, the French and African monarchs
Robert Aldrich

The British invaded Ethiopia when Emperor Theodore held several Englishmen captive in disgruntlement at lack of British support for the Christian monarch's defence of his country against Muslim neighbours. The rehabilitation of banished rulers provides a useful entry-point for this chapter on kings from black Africa, who, vilified and toppled by Europeans, now figure on the honour roll of African statesmen. Béhanzin is enshrined in the pantheon of indigenous rulers and resisters to European colonialism, and even the French pay tribute to his state-building and the achievements of his court. Most cases of African exile came during the early decades of colonisation, though the weapon of deposition continued to be deployed well into the post-First World War period, and it remained in the arsenal even as African nations approached independence.

in Banished potentates
Ranavalona III, 1897
Robert Aldrich

Ranavalona III counted among a very small number of reigning women monarchs anywhere in the world in the late nineteenth century. Ranavalona's reign, removal and life in exile present interesting perspectives on gender, monarchy and colonialism. After the removal of Ranavalona, the French tried to replace monarchical panoply with republican pageantry and power. The pomp and defiant stance of the monarch at her coronation in 1883 had weakened into impotence by 1895, and Ranavalona could do little but acquiesce to French demands. For the French colonial historian Marc Michel, 'on the eve of French intervention, both the Malagasy society and state were in the midst of a major crisis, a ripe fruit was ready to fall'. The French continued to control Madagascar until it regained independence in 1960. The Malagasy might applaud the French gesture, and pledge fealty to the Republic, but disappointed expectations would fuel anti-colonial nationalism.

in Banished potentates