Roger Sabin

Chapter 1 introduces the magazine, which was Duval’s primary site of publication, and her place within it. Themes that emerge affecting her work relate to the serial publication of the magazine and its political orientation, and the way in which Duval’s work was juxtaposed with the contributions of others, notably the cartoonist of the main ‘cut’ (the illustration with the highest status), William Boucher. The chapter emphasises the innovative nature not only of Judy but also of Duval’s role within the magazine and, by extension, her role in developing cartooning itself.

in Marie Duval
Queens & Kings and Other Things
Roger Sabin

Chapter 4 examines Duval’s only children’s book, with particular reference to its relationship to Edward Lear’s nonsense verse, other influences on its content and its contemporary reception. The book’s lavish production values point to a high point in her career, and its mode of address to a willingness to experiment.

in Marie Duval
Roger Sabin

Chapter 9 considers Duval’s role in the developing canon of women artists and writers, and her connections with ‘serio-comic’ modes of female performance. An extensive survey of her strips and cartoons reveals indications of her attitudes to gender and politics, initiating a discussion of her work as potentially proto-feminist.

in Marie Duval
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Maverick Victorian Cartoonist

Marie Duval: Maverick Victorian cartoonist offers the first critical appraisal of the work of Marie Duval (Isabelle Émilie de Tessier [1847–90]), one of the most unusual, pioneering and visionary cartoonists of the later nineteenth century.

Taking a critical theory approach, the book discusses key themes and practices of Duval’s vision and production, relative to the wider historic social, cultural and economic environments in which her work was made, distributed and read. It identifies Duval as an exemplary radical practitioner in an urban media environment, in which new professional definitions were being created, and in which new congruence between performance, illustration, narrative drawing and novels emerged. The book divides into two sections: Work and Depicting and Performing, interrogating the relationships between the developing practices and the developing forms of the visual cultures of print, story-telling, drawing and stage performance. On one hand, the book focuses on the creation of new types of work by women and gendered questions of authorship in the attribution of work, and on the other, the book highlights the style of Duval’s drawings relative to both the visual conventions of theatre production and the significance of the visualisation of amateurism and vulgarity. The book pays critical attention to Duval the practitioner and to her work, establishing her as a unique but exemplary figure in the foundational development of a culture of print, visualisation and narrative drawing in English, in a transformational period of the nineteenth century.

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Simon Grennan, Roger Sabin, and Julian Waite
in Marie Duval