Sheryllynne Haggerty

Liverpool's success has often been attributed to, and marred by, its being the leader in the slave trade after 1750. Thomas Case provides an illuminating case study of Liverpool's relationship with Britain's Atlantic empire. Despite his involvement in the transatlantic slave trade, amongst other things, Case was declared bankrupt in 1778. Case's involvement in the slave trade appears to have begun in 1754 when he went into partnership with Nicholas Southworth. The profits of the slave trade have always been highly contentious, and unfortunately Case and Southworth's records do not record the net profit of the whole enterprise. The mix of trade between slaves, dry goods and groceries in the Kingston house was a reflection of two main factors. The slave trade was a risky business, and the diversification of trade helped to mitigate that risk.

in The empire in one city?
Liverpool’s inconvenient imperial past

Liverpool occupies a prominent position in the contemporary popular imagination. In spite of decades of economic decline, urban decay and a name associated by some with poverty and crime, the city's reputation is by no means a negative one. The book is a collection of essays that focuses on the strength of Liverpool's merchant marine, representing both informal and formal empire over centuries. It discusses the interracial relationships in 1950s and 1960s Liverpool to demonstrate that many African and Afro-Caribbean sailors (and others) married or had relationships with white women. Given existing deficiencies in the historiographies of both Liverpool and the British Empire, the book aims to reassess both Liverpool's role within the British imperial system and the impact on the port city of its colonial connections. Liverpool's success has often been attributed to, and marred by, its being the leader in the slave trade after 1750. Napoleonic Wars were a period of great turbulence and difficulty for the Liverpool commercial community. Liverpool is perceived as a diasporic city, however, its ambiguous nineteenth-century identity reflected the tensions of its complex migrant connections. An analysis of Liverpool's business connections with South America reveals its relative commercial decline and the notion of 'gentlemanly capitalism'. The African ethnology collection of National Museums Liverpool's (NML) ethnology collections are displayed in the 'World Cultures' gallery of the World Museum Liverpool, which opened in 2005. Liverpool is perhaps not exceptional, though its networks are notable and striking.

Abstract only
The empire in one city?
Sheryllynne Haggerty, Anthony Webster and Nicholas J. White

This introduction presents an overview of key concepts discussed in the subsequent chapters of this book. The book focuses on the strength of Liverpool's merchant marine, representing both informal and formal empire over centuries. The numbers of non-white colonial immigrants in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Liverpool were relatively small. The book also focuses on interracial relationships in 1950s and 1960s Liverpool to demonstrate that many African and Afro-Caribbean sailors (and others) married or had relationships with white women. It provides a classic example of how Liverpool's long-standing colonial connections had a disturbing influence upon popular attitudes into and beyond the era of decolonisation. The city's international commercial relationships have been characterised as 'global' rather than imperial in nature, downplaying the intertwining of the interests of all its social groups with those of the empire.

in The empire in one city?