Abstract only
Charlotte Yonge and the ‘martial ardour’ of ‘a soldier’s daughter’

Charlotte Yonge’s close family connections with significant military men gave her a deep admiration for the discipline and courage of soldiers. She believed military manliness to be non-gendered and cross-generational and that it could be instilled through the retelling of fictional and factual stories. Her many bestselling books provided attractive, credible role models for her readers to emulate. Such attitudes chimed with those of her mentor, Rev. John Keble, and other members of the Oxford Movement, for whom the Christian life was one of perpetual warfare.

in Martial masculinities