Abstract only
European integration as a system of conflict resolution in the Franco-German relationship (1950–63)
Boyka Stefanova

) The predatory behavior of the past is finished. This is a Germany of the Bundesrepublik; the country has been ‘Europeanized.’ Markovitz and Reich (1997: XI) Introduction This case study examines the original application of regional integration as a system of conflict resolution in the example of the

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Problematising the normative connection
Eşref Aksu

W IDESPREAD INTRA-STATE CONFLICT is not a new phenomenon. Its rise to the centre of attention in international policy circles is. UN involvement in intra-state conflicts is not new either. What is new is the increasing systematisation of UN involvement in conflict-torn societies. It is these two novelties of the post-Cold War world that shape the main concerns of this study. What is problematised

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

to kill or capture bin Laden, military operations were widely seen as having succeeded long before: al-Qaeda forces in the country had effectively been destroyed, the Taliban ousted and a new government installed, on 22 December 2001. At the same time, it was also a premature declaration of victory, since conflict continued long afterwards: in 2007 ‘major clashes’ were still being reported between

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

Belgian authorities fixed these categories. The Tutsis were seen by Europeans as a non-indigenous and superior race, who had had a civilising influence on the backward Hutus and whose continuing privileges were essential to maintaining order. There was certainly conflict between Hutu and Tutsi in Rwanda (and in neighbouring Burundi) in the past, including large-scale massacres – notably in the period

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Abstract only
Philip Hammond

The last of our case studies concerns another conflict which, at the time of writing, is still ongoing: the invasion and occupation of Iraq. Military action was launched by a US-led coalition on 20 March 2003 as a ‘pre-emptive’ strike, justified mainly through allegations (subsequently proven to be false) that Iraq possessed ‘weapons of mass destruction’ (WMD). A secondary

in Framing post-Cold War conflicts
Ben O’Loughlin

25 Images of the world, images of conflict 1 Ben O’Loughlin1 In the short story ‘The Fearful Sphere of Pascal’, Borges wrote, ‘It may be that universal history is the history of a few metaphors’ (Borges 2007, 189). The history of world politics certainly seems marked by a few recurring concepts and metaphors:  the universal and the particular, the inside and the outside, the balance of power and the ideal of symmetry and actuality of chaos. If these metaphors are the basis for how we understand world politics today, then they also shape how we remember past

in Image operations
Eşref Aksu

though the deeper roots of the Khmer Rouge’s hostility towards Vietnam lay in the historical animosity between the Khmer and Vietnamese, 9 the more recent political cause of the conflict was their relationship with Sihanouk. In the early 1970s, the Khmer Rouge had tried to get rid of Sihanouk in order to establish their own rule in Cambodia. At first, North Vietnam seemed a natural ally for the Khmer

in The United Nations, intra-state peacekeeping and normative change
Georgina Sinclair

-bashing The Malayan Police played a crucial role during the ensuing conflict that spanned over a decade. 3 By 1952, 100,000 regular and auxiliary police, 189,000 Home Guards and 45,000 Kampong Guards were assisting the armed forces, often in a frontline capacity. The previous year, the Home Guard, a largely unarmed force had been amalgamated with the Kampong Guard, armed typically with shotguns. The Kampong

in At the end of the line
Janel B. Galvanek and Hans J. Giessmann

7 Everyday resistance to conflict resolution measures and opportunities for systemic conflict transformation Janel B. Galvanek and Hans J. Giessmann Introduction Initiatives and measures for conflict resolution are often met with resistance from various conflict stakeholders, often those groups and individuals whom the measures are designed to assist. Much of this resistance is labelled by the owners of such initiatives as ‘spoiler’ activity – seen as opposed to conflict resolution in general – and is therefore disregarded. However, not all resistance should be

in Cultures of governance and peace
Sandra Buchanan

This assessment to date has delivered some stark insights: conflict is a costly experience with no quick-fix solutions to sustainable conflict transformation. Transforming a violent society into one that allows societal structures and levels to co-exist peacefully is a complex, multi-faceted and long-term task. It is worth noting that ‘social

in Transforming conflict through social and economic development