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Considering the place of history and heritage in early twentieth-century Australia and Canada alongside that of New Zealand, a number of things become clear. First is the ubiquity of colonial concern with ‘history making’, and in particular the perceived didactic power of the past in the preservation and maintenance of ‘values’ – values that were typically construed within

in History, heritage, and colonialism
History, myth, and the New Zealand Wars

free-floating national memory, political and cultural variables rendered the New Zealand Wars not ‘forgotten’ but ‘ignored’. James Belich has gone even further, describing Titokowaru’s War – one of the key Taranaki conflicts of the late 1860s – as a buried memory, a ‘dark secret of New Zealand history, forgotten by the Pakeha as a child forgets a nightmare’. 4 Keenan’s comparison between New

in History, heritage, and colonialism
John MacKenzie and the study of imperialism

MacKenzie school’ or ‘MacKenzieites’ rather provocatively, his critique was nevertheless indicative of the stature and respect that John MacKenzie has earned through both the Series and his own impressive, varied and often pioneering scholarship. 2 Yet there is something of an irony in the ascription of such a central position in a ‘school’ of imperial history to a scholar who has often promoted and

in Writing imperial histories

The Studies in Imperialism series has pioneered a comparative and connected approach to imperial history. The Series has been at the forefront of the study of imperial networks: from personal and professional networks, to networks of steamships and aircraft and lines of communication. Migration has always been a central concern. To begin with, the volumes focused on primarily the history of

in Writing imperial histories
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Unconventionality and queerness in Katherine Everett’s life writing

of queer life, broadly defined, in twentieth-­century Britain. Laura Doan warns against ‘attaching our own labels to past sexual lives’ and so shaping those lives ‘to look like our own’.2 Noting the geneaological preoccupations (whether in the ancestral or Foucauldian sense) of much queer historiography, Doan calls for the practice of a queer critical history that could ‘explain aspects of the sexual past that resist explanation in the context of identity history.’3 After a brief biographical sketch, this chapter attempts an ancestral genealogy, amassing the

in British queer history
History and heritage in late nineteenth-century Canada and Australia

While many elements of New Zealand’s ‘use and abuse’ of history and heritage are representative of the wider colonial experience, one of this book’s core arguments has been that, in considering how societies use the past, ‘empire’, ‘nation’, and the ‘local’ cannot be considered outside of the context of one another. This final chapter accordingly offers a counterpoint to

in History, heritage, and colonialism
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The meaning of food to New Zealand and Australian nurses far from home in World War I, 1915–18

nurses by offering recognisable, yet oddly altered, aspects of daily life, even those that were fashioned from a common cultural stock. Mealtimes, for example, might contain familiar foods yet require different etiquette. Nurses, wrenched from their familiar setting, friends and family, and grappling with the harshness of war and the heavy weight of war work, tried to make sense of their daily lives in their diaries and letters home. A  recurring feature in their writing was food. Recent histories have explained nurses’ experience in this war. Hallett, for example

in Histories of nursing practice
Disciplining indecency and sodomy in the Edwardian fleet

Sociocultural analyses of the Royal Navy v 3 v The Admiralty’s gaze: disciplining indecency and sodomy in the Edwardian fleet Mary Conley It is difficult to imagine that a historical study about homoerotic practices in the navy represents a new naval history – when it has been a site for naval research for forty years, yet the approach to engaging in studies of maritime sexualities has changed since Arthur Gilbert’s initial studies on disciplining sodomy cases in the eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century Royal Navy.1 Within the past twenty years, there has

in A new naval history
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Sexuality and the writing of colonial history

imperial history; indeed, many would have regarded it as irrelevant or inappropriate to the great questions of scholarship. Yet the establishment of The Journal of the History of Sexuality, also in 1990, confirmed the academic legitimacy of the subject. Sex in the colonies: Before Hyam Many currents contributed to the surge of work on the history of sexuality. 2 The new social

in Writing imperial histories
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, eclectic vision and relentless energy of its general editor, John MacKenzie. Under his careful guidance, Studies in Imperialism has played a conspicuous role in reshaping both British and Imperial histories, partly by greatly expanding their respective repertoires to explore new and previously neglected subjects, and partly by fixing attention more firmly on their tightly interwoven relationship. 1 Over the

in Writing imperial histories