Abstract only
Leslie C. Green

Members of the armed forces must extend to these too the rights and protections afforded by the law of armed conflict. 93 It is not for the soldier in the field to determine his conduct in accordance with what he believes to be the political approach of his government. Thus soldiers should be reminded that enemy personnel falling into their hands must be treated as prisoners of war; it is not for them to decide upon the

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

that Act, a compromise which pleases few, perhaps explains why governments of all political colours shy away from entering the battlefields on sanctity of human life. Attempts to amend the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 relating to the time-limit for abortion 83 unleashed an outburst of vitriolic abuse unknown in even the most hard-fought party political battle. Political disinclination to engage in debate on the sanctity of life means that to a large extent the regulation of the medical profession on issues of life and death has been left to

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Margaret Brazier and Emma Cave

’s-length bodies. The Act aimed to give doctors control – to ‘liberat[e] the NHS from central control and political interference’. 25 It was hoped that transparency, competition and choice would promote a rise in standards and patient safety. The Francis Inquiry showed that this was not enough. In the wake of the 2012 reforms, the spotlight is very much on the healthcare regulators. The various tiers of regulation do not always work in harmony. Work-based regulation is designed not only to enhance patient safety, but also to ensure the economic accountability of NHS

in Medicine, patients and the law (sixth edition)
Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

‘interpersonal violence’: violence between individuals, including ‘family and intimate partner violence and community violence,’ the former committed within the context of the family, ‘community’ referring to 22 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 22 24/03/2020 11:01 The anamnesis ‘acquaintance and stranger violence,’ violence in workplaces and other institutions.4 The WHO categorisation does not precisely match my vertical dimension, although we can regard the WHO notion of ‘collective violence,’ meaning social, political and economic violence, as also referring to violence

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Leslie C. Green

by the Charter of the Nuremberg Tribunal. 169 It should be remembered, however, that this is only a recommendation lacking any legal force, but possessing significant political authority. Nevertheless, there is a tendency among the members of the United Nations, as well as writers, to accept this resolution as declaratory of customary law, especially as the International Law Commission

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Leslie C. Green

and localities. 67 There is, of course, nothing to prevent a party establishing such a zone in peacetime and informing other parties to the Convention of it. Medical and religious personnel whose detention is no longer necessary for the ministration to the wounded and sick should be allowed to return to their own party, without discrimination on racial, religious or political grounds in selecting those

in The contemporary law of armed conflict
Privacy, liability and interception
Christopher T. Marsden

assertion of the broader social, economic and political value of universal and non-discriminatory access to Internet resources among those connected to the Internet’. 43 He also argued that the tendency of governments in both repressive and traditionally democratic regimes to impose liability on IAPs to censor content for a plethora of reasons argues for a policy of robust non

in Network neutrality
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

as ‘prevention, protection, prosecution and policies,’ to use the pillars of the Council of Europe Istanbul Convention – and jurisprudence is quite abundant in that respect. In the vertical dimension, as Rebecca Cook has argued, ‘the challenge remains of requiring States to satisfy the positive duty of providing qualified services where women have no access to them on their own.’1 This is especially true, for example, in the field of access to contraceptives, since this ‘may depend on governments’ financial resources and the political will to allocate them to the

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Towards Specialised Services?
Christopher T. Marsden

to the issue of independent measurement research in the concluding chapter. Why this political obsession with explosions that do not exist? Critics continue to explain that telecoms companies have continually underestimated the value of peer-to-peer communications, which is their core value proposition, and have overestimated the ‘content is king’ argument that IPTV and other forms of

in Network neutrality
Leslie C. Green

in every way with the Coalition against Iraq. Coalition authorities apologised for such intrusions and any damage caused. 35 The neutral state is under a duty to protect its neutrality against such intrusions and failure to do so may result in violations of its air space by aircraft of the opposing belligerent. The decision as to such ‘violation’ is political and should not be made by an aircraft

in The contemporary law of armed conflict