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account for the continued presence of the Customs Service in port prophylaxis into the 1890s and has subsequently ignored the complexities and ambiguities which the continued dual authority entailed. The contagion/anti-contagion debate The political importance of quarantine in international affairs is not a new area of enquiry. Scholars as far back as Erwin Ackerknecht in 1948 have explored the relationship between disease control and politics, examining their connections and implications for science and aetiology, geography and economic systems.3 03_Krista_Ch-2.indd

in The English System
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Cholera, collectivity and the care of the social body

prevails’. It then added, almost as an afterthought: At this present period too, when a malignant disorder is raging in the city, anything which tends to draw together crowds of persons should be avoided and on this ground, the Board of Health have joined the magistrates in discontinuing an illumination.4 The unfolding drama of the Reform Act played out against the spectral backdrop of cholera, which had finally arrived in Britain, after increasingly anxious anticipation, in October 1831. On the pages of the city’s newspapers political speculation and diatribe shared

in Performing medicine
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) in 1948. In the process, it reveals the ways in which national ideas about the organisation of nursing impacted on the lives of ordinary nurses. It explains why the management of nurses’ health changed over time and between places and sets these changes within a wider context of social, political and economic history. The purpose of the introductory chapter is, firstly, to establish why this question is important and, secondly, to set out the analytical themes that ­underpin its subsequent discussion. 1 Who cared for the carers? Managing nurses’ health today The

in Who cared for the carers?

this Western sanitary technology and set of practices – presented to the local populations as beneficial instruments of modernity – facilitated colonial incursions in the political economies of these countries, most of which – apart from Morocco – were under Ottoman rule. In order to explore such issues, I shall focus on the several sanitary councils (also known as quarantine boards) created in the main regional ports. Although a thoroughly researched study still needs to be undertaken, this chapter uses the literature available to explore these sanitary councils as

in Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914
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Mediterranean quarantine disclosed: space, identity and power

medical ‘bio-political technologies’ deployed in those sanitation epicentres over the ‘bodies’ of quarantined individuals.3 Finally, scholarly works from a variety of disciplines comprising archaeology and cultural studies have explored the multiple uses of quarantine in the construction of individual and collective identities, as well as in the creation of memories of migration and cross-border travel.4 As a consequence of the fertilisation from these multiple theoretical standpoints, quarantine history has been expanded into ‘quarantine studies’, an ever more fertile

in Mediterranean Quarantines, 1750–1914
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experience, to examine the ways in which medical practitioners presented themselves to the public and how they positioned themselves within the broader social, political and intellectual landscape. It is a book about late eighteenth- and early nineteenth-century English medical culture, a study of what it meant to be a doctor and how this changed over time. To some this might seem a strange endeavour. Surely, the sceptic might suggest, what it means to be a doctor is a timeless constant, relatively impervious to the vagaries of historical change. Has not medicine always

in Performing medicine

further described below, in the political arena selected policy responses underlie the employment of particular metaphoric patterns and ‘framings’ of social issues and marginalized groups. In addition to drawing attention to linguistic metaphors, scholars frequently point out the importance of more broad ‘conceptual metaphors’. Indeed, it is conceptual metaphors that are primarily described within the analysis section of this book. According to Allbritton, a conceptual metaphor relates not just to a metaphorical term or phrase, but to a general way of thinking about a

in Framing the moron
More than just passing the time

became more politicised. Deaf culture moved from being the way deaf people behaved naturally to something which was more explicitly treasured and celebrated.7 Evidence to support Bourdieu’s argument that capital could also be accessed through activities that are specifically political can be found in the actions of deaf club members. The activities of deaf club members were largely self-determined, increasingly so during the post-war period. Deaf people ran the deaf clubs on a day-to-day basis and it was the members who largely determined the calendar of social events

in Deafness, community and culture in Britain
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unhelpful. Legitimate differences exist within both religious (McDonagh and MacNamara, 2013) and secular traditions (Turner, 2003), and ascribing positions simply on the basis of religious affiliation­/­ non-­affiliation stifles dialogue. There has tended to be limited political appetite for discussion of ethical issues in healthcare. This derives in part at least from political timidity, which was perhaps an inevitable response to the polarised nature of debates around the introduction of the Eighth Amendment to Bunreacht na hÉireann in 1983 (Hesketh, 1990). Because of

in Ethical and legal debates in Irish healthcare
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from her work with ‘The Medical World of Early Modern England, Wales and Ireland 1500–1715’ project at the University of Exeter.7 More research is needed to find out how some of these individuals, such as Elizabeth Alkin, Thomas Clarges and John Troutbeck, rose through their civil-war medical service to become individuals of national political importance.8 The essays in this volume also support the contention that the civil wars were a landmark moment in the history of medicine. Medical personnel had many more opportunities to practice their trade and learn from

in Battle-scarred