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Carnivàle, Supernatural, and Millennium
Julia M. Wright

consecrated to his worship. 1 This is not just an eighteenth-century view of the “barbarous,” but one that Jean Baudrillard also finds powerful: the modern political imaginary goes increasingly in the direction of delaying, of concealing for as

in Men with stakes
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Horror and the avant-garde in the cinema of Ken Jacobs
Marianne Shaneen

fetishistically. The film image as a cipher possesses both wondrous and terrifying power, which can be potentially devastating. This is particularly so – as Walter Benjamin claimed and Leni Riefenstahl demonstrated – when transferred to the realm of politics and the perpetuation of dehumanising ideologies. While Jacobs appeals to cinema’s origins in magic, he does so with a critique of the deeply problematic ritual

in Monstrous adaptations
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Peter Marks

the scale of the rest of the film’. 27 In its own right Crimson Permanent creates and sustains a more measured atmosphere that reinforces its political warning of a kinder, more humane world being overtaken by corporate values. The film constructs a world sufficiently detailed and coherent to warrant audience empathy, the hard-working accountants being re-imagined at one point as Roman galley

in Terry Gilliam
Peter Marks

in order to defraud the gullible inhabitants. He abhors the hold folk wisdom has over the German peasantry, seeing it as an affront to his own very French rationalism, which he links to his nation’s cultural superiority. Worse, for him, the powers attributed to the supernatural undermine French political control. On pain of death, he forces the Grimms to retrieve the missing children. Overseen by

in Terry Gilliam
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The horrors of class in Eric Kripke’s Supernatural
Julia M. Wright

Lang, 2005); Stephen J. Ducat, The Wimp Factor: Gender Gaps, Holy Wars, and the Politics of Anxious Masculinity (Boston: Beacon Press, 2004 ); Loren Glass, “Publicizing the president’s privates,” Postmodern Culture , 9:3 ( 1999 ). 3 There is also significant overlap between the two series

in Men with stakes
Peter Hutchings

attacks her. The rape scene is perhaps a rare example of a crass commercial decision helping to clarify a film’s identity. The authority of Frankenstein is presented not only as monstrous per se but also as founded on a ruthless and violent objectification of the woman. Throughout Fisher’s 1960s horror films, a rudimentary sexual politics of male authority is gradually becoming visible, with male authority figures viewed

in Terence Fisher