Search results

Abstract only
Survival and afterlife
Ben Worthy

success, as the radical group overrode and took potential resistance by surprise. It produced a political vision of FOI as a giving-away of power, in a policy loaded with symbolism – with no government veto, no broad Cabinet exclusion and a strong harm test. The White Paper encapsulated the radical, anti-establishment ideas of constitutional reform, imbued with ideas of empowerment, democracy and change. The second stage took a very different form. The loss of the radical group’s power and new leadership meant ‘normalcy’ returning. The draft Bill proposals were a much

in The politics of freedom of information
Abstract only
The retreat becomes a rout
Ben Worthy

limiting features. Underneath was a changing notion and new ‘justifying narrative’ of what FOI meant. The law moved from a proposal driven by certain radical features to a broader, less threatening, legalistic vision of The 1999 draft Bill: the retreat becomes a rout 75 a balanced law aimed at services and delivery rather than at central government itself. Yet time and politics allowed FOI to escape from the committee. The passage, even in its heavily scaled-back form, rested once more on a political calculation. A compromise that the law would be implemented only

in The politics of freedom of information
The development of FOI in Britain
Ben Worthy

accurate information, and are permitted the free exchange of their views and their opinions: That is essential to good government. (Hansard Corpus; Informationrightsandwrongs 8/112015) However, as Table 2.1 shows, there was little interest or mention of either FOI or Open Government until the 1960s. The politics of freedom of information 24 Table 2.1  Mentions of ‘freedom of information’ and ‘open government’ in the UK Parliament, 1880–2000 Year Mentions of ‘freedom of information’ Mentions of ‘open government’ 1880 1910 1920 1940 1950 1960 1970 1980 1990 2000

in The politics of freedom of information
Abstract only
Full-time breadwinners and part-time fathers
Michael Rush

chapter highlights The United Kingdom 65 a shift in epistemological thinking towards a ‘Nordic turn’ in the British politics of parental leave, and signs of battle fatigue in following the Americans into a cost-recovery model of child support. The changing nature of fatherhood and parental leave debates A study of male attitudes towards parental leave in Great Britain explained that parental leave was introduced as a legal right for workers under the Employment Relations Act in 1999 following the European Union Directive on Parental Leave in 1996 (Dermott, 2001

in Between two worlds of father politics
Asymmetric warfare
Ben Worthy

provided momentum, expertise and publicity, bringing pressure to bear both inside and outside Parliament, often simultaneously. The alliance sought to frame, or reframe, discussion of the policy back to a more political and radical view of FOI. The radicals pushed the symbolic power of FOI and its positive effects for the government and Britain’s democracy, while framing any weakening or failure as a ‘betrayal’ not only of the government’s promise but also of its commitment to democratic renewal and political radicalism. Yet the power of the radicals was limited. First

in The politics of freedom of information
Abstract only
State-supported agency
Michael Rush

pursued as an epochal political project over the course of the twentieth century dating back to the 1915 Scandinavian marriage law reforms (Kjeldstad, 2001; Therborn, 2004). The first section of this chapter adopts a historical approach to the Nordic development of parental leave policies, which is traced back to the introduction of parental leave insurance systems in 1974. To illustrate the contemporary Swedish experience, as the paradigmatic case, the chapter draws on research by Bergman and Hobson (2002), Klinth (2008) and Chronholm (2009) on the welfare state

in Between two worlds of father politics
Abstract only
‘Vulnerable fathers’, invisible fatherhood
Michael Rush

5 Ireland: ‘vulnerable fathers’, invisible fatherhood Introduction This chapter investigates the extent of American or Swedish influences on the social politics of fatherhood in the Republic of Ireland. The chapter begins by reviewing the introduction of the Liable Relative Provision (LRP) under Part III of the Social Welfare Act (1989) as a way of recovering ‘some or all of the social welfare issued to the One Parent Family Payment recipient concerned’ (Department of Social, Community and Family Affairs, 2000:106). The chapter locates the Irish variant of the

in Between two worlds of father politics
Michael Rush

the social politics of fatherhood in Japan and China in the context of the two regimes of fatherhood model, and identifies a ‘Nordic shift’ in Japan, driven by grassroots, epistemological and government concerns (Lambert, 2007:2), but one that was hampered by Japanese employer intransigence (Seeleib-Kaiser and Toivonen, 2011:351). In the case of China, the chapter suggests that Confucian values no longer apply (Therborn, 2004:94; Xia et al., 2014:258), but instead the privatisation of housing and the practice of families buying houses exclusively for their sons

in Between two worlds of father politics
Abstract only
State-enforced agency
Michael Rush

politics epitomised by groups such as the Promise Keepers, and by the formation of umbrella groups such as the National Fatherhood Initiative and the American Fathers Coalition, which made for a paradigmatic case. Finally, a key feature, or rather non-feature, of the American model was the way the USA lagged behind other advanced welfare states in the provision of parental leave for fathers (Ray et al., 2008; National Partnership for Women and Families, 2012b:3). From a comparative perspective it was claimed that parents in the USA were faced with an entrenched case of

in Between two worlds of father politics
Paul Collinson

3 Environmental attitudes, community development, and local politics in Ireland Paul Collinson Anyone who has ever visited Ireland will be immediately struck by the natural beauty of the country. From the rugged uplands of the west, the golden beaches of Cork and Kerry, the rolling drumlins of the midlands to the sea cliffs of the north, Ireland is undoubtedly blessed with one of the richest and most diverse environmental endowments in Europe. Attracted by tourist brochures and advertisements which play heavily on images of Ireland as a rural paradise, tourists

in Alternative countrysides