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From protest to resistance
Matthew Worley, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Sian Lincoln and Bill Osgerby

, Senseless Acts of Beauty: Cultures of Resistance since the Sixties (London: Verso, 1996); Marcus, Lipstick Traces.   19 The original steering committee that founded the Network comprised: Jon Garland, Keith Gildart, Anna Gough-Yates, Paul Hodkinson, Sian Lincoln, Bill Osgerby, Lucy Robinson, John Street, Pete Webb and Matthew Worley.   20 For information on the Networks and news of its activities, see www.reading.ac.uk/ history/research/hist-subcultures.aspx. A Facebook page is also available under the name ‘Subcultures, popular music and social change’.

in Fight back
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Matron and mistress of misrule
Andrew Roberts

Hungry Years: Confessions of a Food Addict . London : Bloomsbury . Manvell , Roger ( 1955 ), The Film and The Public , London : Penguin Books . Marwick , Arthur ( 1982 ), British Society Since 1945 , London : Pelican Books . Marwick , Arthur ( 1998 ), The Sixties: Cultural Revolution in Britain, France, Italy, and the United States, c.1958–c.1974 , Oxford : Oxford University Press . Medhurst , Andy ( 1992 ), ‘Carry On Camp’ , Sight & Sound , August, 16 – 20 . Medhurst , Andy ( 2007 ), A National

in Idols of the Odeons
Alistair Cole

‘administrative convenience should not guide democracy in Wales’. 66 BEYOND DEVOLUTION AND DECENTRALISATION The backbench Assembly members interviewed in 2001 and 2002 clearly were politically inexperienced and bewildered by the complexity of the governing arrangements. Only seven of the sixty Assembly Members elected in 1999 had previously held Westminster mandates, and most had a background in local government. In most interviews with Assembly members from all parties, strong demands were formulated for new powers. A majority of members interviewed favoured moving to a

in Beyond devolution and decentralisation
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Alan Watts and the visionary tradition
Laurence Coupe

Upanishads. The significance of this moment should not be underestimated: Kerouac’s reading of Walden, and later of Buddhist teachings, clearly marked a new era in his life, but it also marked a new era in the life of the nation, since Kerouac’s awakening to Buddhism stirred similar searches in other members of the Beat Generation, and in the hippies of the sixties, thus helping to bend postwar counterculture eastward. Just as Kerouac, in a mood of desolation over a lost love and a large pile of unpublished manuscripts, had turned to Thoreau and to Buddhist texts, many

in Beat sound, Beat vision
Open Access (free)
Cultural and political change in 1960s Britain
Steven Fielding

to a formal commitment to nationalisation, Labour was ‘social reformist’ ‘by tradition and practice’, although the balance between the two was ‘constantly shifting’.135 Labour’s course in the late 1950s and early 1960s appeared to vindicate Foot’s assessment. As the New Left writer Perry Anderson noted, by passing the policy document Industry and Society in 1957 the party conference legitimised capitalism, although it assumed an anti-capitalist stance when Signposts for the Sixties was embraced three years later.136 Despite this apparent indeterminacy, many

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Open Access (free)
Steven Fielding

’s modernity.92 With these objects in mind, in July 1960 Phillips presented to the NEC a document entitled ‘The state of the party’, which: was subsequently expanded and given the more optimistic title of ‘The future of the party’; eventually became Labour in the Sixties; was elaborated into the pamphlet series Signposts for the Sixties; and finally formed the basis for Labour’s 1964 manifesto. The NEC commended Labour in the Sixties to the 1960 conference, although it did not, as was customary with such documents, endorse it. Instead, it was designated as ‘the work of the

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Open Access (free)
Steven Fielding

; Modern Records Centre (MRC), Labour Party West Midlands Region papers, MSS6/3/1/368, organiser’s report. 26 South West Region papers, 38423/20, Whiles to Cox, 4 May 1966. 27 Report of the Thirty-Eighth National Conference of Labour Women (1961), pp. 47–8. 28 Report of the Sixty-Seventh Annual Conference of the Labour Party (1968), pp. 119–28; Report of the Forty-Sixth National Conference of Labour Women (1969), pp. 35–6. 29 LPA, NEC minutes, 23 April 1969, B. Lockwood, Forty-sixth national conference of Labour women, NAD/W49/4/69. 30 NLWAC minutes, 2 June and 8

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Steven Fielding

Party, Time for Decision (1966), pp. 18–19. 6 Report of the Sixty-Seventh Annual Conference of the Labour Party (1968), pp. 340–2. 7 M. Taylor, ‘Labour and the constitution’, in D. Tanner, P. Thane and N. Tiratsoo (eds), Labour’s First Century (Cambridge, 2000). 8 L. Barrow and I. Bullock, Democratic Ideas and the British Labour Movement, 1880–1914 (Cambridge, 1996). 9 P. Joyce, Realignment of the Left? A History of the Relationship Between the Liberal Democrat and Labour Parties (1999), pp. 70–2; N. Riddell, Labour in Crisis. The Second Labour Government, 1929

in The Labour Governments 1964–70 volume 1
Homosexuality and the Left in post-war Britain
Lucy Robinson

. The ‘aged, the sick and other dependent groups [were] increasingly looking [to Labour] for their salvation’.19 As the contradictions of the ‘affluent age’ become increasingly clear Labour needed to engage with the new beneficiaries, but it also needed to expose the limits of affluence to defend its victims. Revisionists argued that technological development had changed the world since Labour’s previous successes. Support for Morgan Phillips’ Labour in the Sixties argued that technological changes separated the experiences of the 1930s from those of the 1960s. A forward

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain
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Law reform, homosexual identity and the role of counter-culture
Lucy Robinson

existing institutions. Surrounding them with a wider turn to a politics of personal experience through culture, was developing. CND: the revolution began as a dove107 The National Campaign Against Nuclear Testing was set up in 1957. In 1958 CND began a series of protest marches between London and Aldermaston that attracted 52 Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain 10,000 people and gained significant press coverage. An often cited quote from International Times explains the significance of CND for ‘the sixties’: The Revolution began as a dove, with a CND sign on its

in Gay men and the Left in post-war Britain