Royalist hospital provision during the First Civil War

‘Dead Hogges, Dogges, Cats and well flayed Carryon Horses’ Chapter 5 ‘Dead Hogges, Dogges, Cats and well flayed Carryon Horses’: royalist hospital provision during the First Civil War Eric Gruber von Arni An army without good hospitals perishes easily, it being impossible that combat actions and sickness will not fill them often and all too abundantly.1 T his chapter will examine the attitudes and actions adopted by the King and his Council of War towards maintaining the health and welfare needs of their troops in Oxford.2 Unfortunately, whereas the

in Battle-scarred

been divided into two factions, the Official IRA (OIRA) and the Provisional IRA (PIRA). In December 1974, a splinter group named Irish National Liberation Army (INLA), politically represented by the Irish Republican Socialist Party (IRSP), broke away from the OIRA. Sinn Féin was the IRA’s political wing. There would be contacts between the IRA, ETA, the RAF (Rote Armee Fraktion; Red Army Faction operating in West Germany) and NORAID (Northern Aid, an American fundraising organisation working in favour of Irish reunification). However, the IRA had been dealt severe

in East German intelligence and Ireland, 1949–90

duties, and the condition that only those who were ineligible for the armed forces could join. Wartime humorists exploited the notion 206 Men’s memories of the Home Guard that, however patriotic, Home Guards were not ‘proper soldiers’. More than two decades later Dad’s Army built its success on the elaboration of this idea. Women’s struggles to participate fully in organised home defence had been, as we saw in Chapter 5, almost entirely ignored in popular culture, for all that individual women were permitted exceptional roles on a temporary basis in some high

in Contesting home defence
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Margaret Harkness, the Salvation Army, and A Curate’s Promise (1921)

After London 12 •• Lasting ties: Margaret Harkness, the Salvation Army, and A Curate’s Promise (1921) Flore Janssen Margaret Harkness published her final novel in 1921, two years before her death in 1923. The text is set at the height of the First World War: its full, lengthy, and very precise title is A Curate’s Promise: A Story of Three Weeks, September 14–October 5 1917. Appearing after Harkness’s long absences from Britain and Europe, during which she transferred her professional life and writing career to Australia and India, A Curate’s Promise shows a

in Margaret Harkness

anti-base campaigners did not universally accept it, the equation of militarization and sterilization of land reached its peacetime peak in the 1960s and 1970s, bolstered by politically radical and grassroots environmentalism.4 Military officials were well aware of this new challenge: in 1971 the army’s general inspector recognized that ‘environmental policies’ would increasingly limit training possibilities.5 A further major change in anti-base campaigns during the 1960s and 1970s was the increasing attention paid to them in France and overseas, particularly to

in Mobilizing nature
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personnel and encourage other queer men and women to join the services. In February 2005, the Royal Navy became one of Stonewall’s Diversity Champions, and in August of the same year the Army and the RAF could be seen recruiting at Manchester’s Gay Pride weekend with the latter displaying an oversized cockpit and a banner •  162  • epilogue proudly proclaiming ‘RAF rise above the rest’. At the Army recruitment stall, men in uniform were reportedly ‘mingl[ing] with eager would-­be recruits, one dressed in tight leather shorts and a pink cowboy hat’.6 Lieutenant Colonel

in Queen and country
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The inter-imperial uses of a racially gendered language

after the Irish Home Rule crisis split the Liberal Party, British feminist Josephine Butler orchestrated a national campaign that attacked the Indian Army policy of licensing native prostitutes to service British soldiers. Butler and her allies publicly castigated army authorities as worse even than native ‘degraded sinners’ for allowing such a system to exist, questioned the morality of British rule in

in Martial races
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and very beautiful monuments commemorating the heroes of that siege. There is even a monument to the ‘drowned ships’, as the Russians call the battleships they sank at the entrance to the harbor in order to deny the allied fleet access. The harbor or bay of Sevastopol divides the city into a northern and a southern section. British, French, Turkish, and latterly Piedmont-Sardinian armies eventually captured the south side. The north side however never fell, and there, throughout the bitterly fought siege, the Russians buried 127,583 men who were killed defending the

in Beyond Nightingale

written without using my words or expressions, and without letting me be pointed to as your correspondent. 3 The letter, buried in Blackwood’s correspondence, speaks volumes about the relationship between the army and the media in late Victorian culture. It demonstrates Roberts’s belief that he could use his personal connection with Blackwood

in Martial races
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German political thriller in which the Stasi agents were the heroes. The same year, ‘Bettina’ joined the Stasi. The person would remain known under this cover name as the 39 million index cards in the archive of the former Stasi in Berlin do not reveal the person’s identity, just a registration number: XV/92/67. ‘Bettina’ was active in the Bonn area, the former capital of the former West Germany. What is known is that ‘Bettina’ was a member of a Stasi unit that targeted ministries including the department of telecommunications of the West German army, the Bundeswehr

in East German intelligence and Ireland, 1949–90