Search results

Abstract only
Alcohol and the Reformation

alehouses – initiated by a Licensing Act of 1552 – had been accompanied by a rise in the condemnation of drunkenness from the pulpit and in print. In rough historical terms the development of a public discourse on drink, in which drink was identified as a specific social ‘problem’ in both literature and legislation, accompanied the spread of the Reformation. This is not to say that there was a direct causal link between the rise of Protestantism chap1.indd 5 22/06/2009 10:52:26 The politics of alcohol and the earliest appearance of the drink question, but it is to

in The politics of alcohol
The gin craze

drunkenness, where a man hath no time to recollect or think, whether he has had enough or not. (Josiah Tucker) So far, we have seen that the changing dynamics of public debates over alcohol have been driven by social, political and economic factors. While hopped beer and port both represented technological developments, their impact was mediated by the wider social contexts which gave those material changes political significance. So far culture, not drink per se, has moulded the drink question. The ‘gin craze’ represents a change of emphasis in this regard. As we shall

in The politics of alcohol
Abstract only
The rise of temperance

Independence had secured, while at the same time religious preachers, railing against the sinfulness of drunkenness in terms already familiar, hitched their arguments to both the notion of America’s religious destiny and its achievement of historically unprecedented political freedoms.6 Lyman Beecher, whose ‘Six Sermons on Intemperance’ (1825) had a direct influence on the founding of the ATS,7 warned that once the people were ‘perverted by intemperance, ambition needs no better implements with which to dig the graves of our liberties, and entomb our glory’.8 The sermons of

in The politics of alcohol
Medicine and the law

12 The study of inebriety: medicine and the law For once grant that inebriety is a disease over which the victim has little or no control, and it follows that the inebriate, like the lunatic, needs to be protected, not only for his own, but for the public good. (Harry Campbell) Prison is no cure for alcoholism. (Hugh Wingfield) The period between 1870 and 1918 saw extensive debate on licensing, management of the drinks trade and the social effects of public drinking. However, it also witnessed intense intellectual and political activity around a parallel, but

in The politics of alcohol
Abstract only

, coruscating events in Rangoon eclipsed the struggles of ordinary people. The Methodist Synod in Mandalay predicted a gloomy and uncertain future. 3 The sheer scale of destruction gnawed away at post-war Burmese politics and undermined public morale. In April 1945 Holden was airlifted into Upper Burma by the Civil Affairs Service Unit (CAS(B)) and he saw for himself the ‘desolation and ruin’ in Mandalay. Harrowing stories were on everyone’s lips. Firth landed in Rangoon in November 1945. A pall of shock and excitement hung over the

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
Alcohol and public health

1960s was not attended by the re-emergence of political temperance. However, this is not to say that there was no action to control excessive drinking at government level. In 1962 fines for drunkenness, which were still set at the levels laid down by Acts of 1839, 1860, 1872 and 1902, were increased to reflect equivalent penalties in modern money. Under the 1964 Licensing Act a £10 fine was imposed for licensees who permitted drunkenness on their premises and the courts were given powers to imprison anyone procuring drinks for a drunken person for up to one month

in The politics of alcohol

5 Vaccine production, national security anxieties and the unstable state in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Mexico Ana María Carrillo Introduction Since pre-Columbian times, Mexico has experienced notable periods of progress in science and technology. Political, economic and social problems have, however, often interrupted these developments, thus the country has been forced to rebuild

in The politics of vaccination
Abstract only
The changing landscape in the 1990s

in the 1970s and 1980s, it struggled to have an impact on policy. The political mood, which had swung towards the liberalisation of the drinks trade in the early 1960s, did not change under Margaret Thatcher’s Conservative administration. If anything, it became more firmly established. This is not to say that there were no concerns over drink and drunkenness. Legislation designed to tackle the problem of drunken anti-social behaviour through the use of exclusion orders was introduced in 1980, as were special regulations to tackle football hooliganism by restricting

in The politics of alcohol
Abstract only

pretend to be, men really full of zeal for the welfare of our fellow creatures’. Although leprosy brought the lives of individual sufferers crashing down, it was not the most important health problem in Burma. It was a political issue. Winston wanted to pre-empt a Catholic Bishop who was planning a large Leper Home in Mandalay, and he promised that the Wesleyan ‘Home will be simply Christian and Protestant, nothing more’. 41 Denominational rivalry fuelled Winston’s demands for funds, but surprisingly the Missionary

in Conflict, politics and proselytism
Fighting a tropical scourge, modernising the nation

agents of the disease, and curative serums were developed. 3 The impact of Freire's vaccine was partly due to the proliferation of microbe hunters, medical and scientific associations and periodicals, colonial and commercial interests, in addition to Freire's zeal in fostering social alliances at a time when science was helping to transform Brazil's political and social structures. Freire's vaccine

in The politics of vaccination