Search results

You are looking at 101 - 110 of 674 items for :

  • Manchester Security, Conflict & Peace x
Clear All
Abstract only

The interview testimony in this book points to a range of influences that, to a greater or lesser extent, informed the structure, trajectory and outcomes of the Northern Ireland peace process. Central to reaching the Good Friday Agreement of 1998 was intense and tenacious engagement from both the British and Irish Governments, along with the efforts of those political parties

in Inside Accounts, Volume II
Abstract only

in eight years to recover the authority of the state (Yarce, 2005b: 10A). For decades, San José de Apartadó has suffered violence from different armed actors, including guerrillas, paramilitaries and the army. In March 1997, after an intense political discussion, more than five hundred people decided to create a neutral territory in which none of the armed groups, including the army, would

in In/security in Colombia

Stating the obvious sometimes has the important effect of reminding us of home truths: the North of Ireland suffers from an underlying crisis of legitimacy and political instability which make its problems enormously difficult to resolve. Though the current situation may be less bleak than the picture drawn in the quote that opens chapter 1

in Everyday life after the Irish conflict
An interview with David Donoghue

new Agreement to propose a wide range of specific and detailed reforms. With the advent of the Anglo-Irish Agreement, we had to ensure that we had persuasive arguments in all the areas under discussion and to develop issues for in-depth handling with the British through the new machinery. For this, we needed to increase considerably both our technical expertise as well as our broader political

in Inside Accounts, Volume II

followers), 2 always target both elite strata. National decapitations, as Robert Conquest, Timothy Snyder, the Memorial Group of historians in Russia, and the Instytut Pamie˛ci Narodowej (IPN, Institute of National Remembrance) historians in Poland argue, destroy whole societies and nations. An eliticide, when prolonged and ruthless, endangers social, political and moral order and undermines the capacity

in Violence and the state

, this has illuminated the analytical tools necessary to rethinking the DSP in an active voice. In this chapter, I want to pursue a detailed analysis of how the DSP constructs and produces political identities in a way that reproduces political violence. This task already assumes that identities can be constructed and produced in in/security discourses. This difference between construction and

in In/security in Colombia
Abstract only

Competing identities within nation states are commonplace in the modern world. Only about 1 in 10 of today’s nation states is ethnically homogeneous (Haymes, 1997 ), leaving considerable scope for ethnic political conflict. Since 1990, ethnonationalist conflict has been particularly intense in the postcommunist states of eastern Europe and central Asia, where ethnic divisions have provided an

in Conflict to peace
Abstract only
European integration as a system of conflict resolution in the Franco-German relationship (1950–63)

Franco-German relationship of the 1950s. The process of Franco-German reconciliation is critically important for ordering the history of European integration. It offers important insights into the formative stages of the European construction and its importance relative to other designs of international organisation. It also informs much of the contemporary understandings of the political relevance of

in The Europeanisation of conflict resolution
Abstract only

The significant decline in state and paramilitary violence in Northern Ireland has been part guided by politically motivated prisoners who have played a vital role in conflict transformation. Former prisoners have contributed to the development of alternative modes of thinking that have challenged once-dominant militarist ideologies. The actors involved in these discursive shifts

in Abandoning historical conflict?
Abstract only

Prevent as a specific assemblage, responding to a novel problematisation of threat, it becomes possible to situate the policy as one that is integral to understanding the terrain of the UK’s contemporary identity politics. As the book has shown, this has resulted in two sets of practices, that, although they mobilise different forms of power, find coherence as a function that seeks to secure the future through transforming those identities deemed risky. The first set of practices emerge as a means of governing environments

in Counter-radicalisation policy and the securing of British identity