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Abstract only
Jeremy Tambling

archi tecture of the arch ive in the Palace of Justice in Riohacha in Chronicle of a Death Foretold . 29 The enclosing spaces of institutional architecture or the architecture of institutions, which record time as chronology, may be placed against the anachronistic structures of an architecture which thinks in terms of the khora , where nothing of identity is fixed. The archive tries to

in On anachronism
Descartes, Sidney
Shankar Raman

introducing a sharp distinction between admissible and inadmissible curves precisely on the grounds of their constructibility. See Bos, ‘On the representation of curves in Descartes’ Géométrie ’, Archive for History of Exact Sciences , 24 (1981), 295–338. 9

in Formal matters
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Richard Wilson

to the ‘old historicist’ and biographical criticism that effaces the literary signifier in its scavenging after facts, as a dialogue between such ‘high theory and low archives’; and in Free Will this approach meets its exemplary analogue in Shakespeare’s struggle to escape his own historicity, and throw off ‘the weight of this sad time’ [ King Lear, 5

in Free Will
Robert Ormsby

stocky, with large round heads, strong jaw lines and powerful necks. The photographs also show actors adopting identical gestures and blocking: in one image that appears in both sets of archival pictures, Schall and Hopkins enter Rome carried on a chair in the post-Corioles procession, their arms extended upwards in victory; Weigel’s and Constance Cummings’s Volumnias hold aloft Coriolanus’ sword in both

in Coriolanus
Caesar under Thatcher
Andrew James Hartley

got no major critical coverage and has no scholarly record. Even the theatre’s own archive has been lost, much of it accidentally thrown out, so my sense of it is built largely out of a brief correspondence with the director, Ron Phillips. His approach to the production was straightforward: In this case, Mrs. Thatcher had been

in Julius Caesar
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

Greenblatt’s work, his tone was less authoritative scholar and more persuasive storyteller. The work of academic experts, who might have cavilled about the provenance and transmission of his sources, was gently dismissed as the ‘dogged archival labour’ of ‘eager scholars’ (p. 212). Greenblatt’s method instead offered a form of expert authority that did not depend upon assertions of fact or

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
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Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

investment had allowed the BBC, acting as both a producer and distributor of TV content, to accumulate an extensive archive of intellectual property that gave them considerable competitive advantage in the new contest over content in the market. In Murdoch’s view, the licence fee constituted an inappropriate subsidy that distorted the market for cultural production and constrained the competitive capacity of

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Kate McLuskie and Kate Rumbold

‘CASE’ study, a strategic collaborative research programme led by the DCMS along with ACE, English Heritage, the Museums, Libraries and Archives Council and Sport England, seemed to confirm the return of the economic measures of culture that Jowell had sought to replace in the early years of the decade. Now, though, the question of ‘What is the economic value of engaging in sport and culture

in Cultural value in twenty-first-century England
Hamlet and the rules of art
Richard Wilson

, between the king and the comedians we can also see here the creator clearing his own aesthetic space. For what these archives expose is the mismatch between absolute monarchy and an equally absolute artist, the English composer’s refusal to submit his introverted ‘fury and fire’ to the Baroque mise-en-scène. In Hamlet , too, the protagonist will pipe his own tune after the ‘cry of players

in Free Will
Robert Shaughnessy

by scholars. An exception is Jean Jacquot, who in 1964 published a lengthy examination of the production in the journal Revue d’Histoire du Théâtre, which drew upon the extensive archival resources of the Copeau collection in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France to argue that it was a ‘revelation’ on a par with that of Twelfth Night (Jacquot 119). 1 Robert

in As You Like It