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Abstract only
John Anderson

Christianity and democracy have had a long and sometimes troubled relationship. The roots of political pluralism are often seen as embedded within the Protestant historical experience of Northern Europe and North America, though whether this was a direct consequence of Reformed Christianity is contested. Conversely, the Roman Catholic Church has been depicted as a social institution that sought to halt the development of democracy from the late eighteenth to the early twentieth century in Europe and Latin America. Very little attention

in Christianity and democratisation
Abstract only
Brian Heffernan

about an awakening of the national idea among the masses. However, formulating the precise contents of the nationalist message – of what it meant to be Italian, or Polish or Irish – was a controversial affair, and different rivals competed for the right to define national identity. In many parts of Europe, the Catholic church was a formidable contender for this task. Catholicism had emerged from its skirmishes with ancien régime monarchs and its life-­or-­death combat with revolution to undergo a remoulding that was very similar to modern nation building. As Peter

in Freedom and the Fifth Commandment
Abstract only
Karin Fischer

involved in the educational sphere. This will be complemented with an analysis of the public debate and of the fluctuations of public opinion on the issue. The current Irish education system is commonly described as denominational and based on religious segregation. As the Catholic Church has remained the owner and manager of the vast majority of the so-called ‘national’ primary schools in the Republic (which are otherwise mostly financed by the State), Catholic schools act as state schools to all intents and purposes. The increasing diversity of the school population

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland
Church, State and modernity in contemporary Ireland
David Carroll Cochran

our voice within the achievements of modernity’ in order to embrace what is good but, at the same time, prophetically respond and offer alternatives to what is not (1999: 36). Secularisation has done the Church a service by dethroning it from political power, but it also creates the opportunity for the Church to take on a new character with a new role in the wake of this dethroning. Enthroning Irish Catholicism Given Ireland’s history of British rule, the rise of the Catholic Church to political and social power was relatively recent, happening while Christendom

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Irish priests and the unravelling of a culture
Eamon Maher

religious landscape, and it will ask the question, ‘Are they prophetic witnesses to gospel values or mere mouthpieces for the Catholic Church?’ The chapter will deal with just one French priest, Jean Sulivan, whose insights into what was happening in his native Brittany and beyond have more than a little relevance for the Irish context. His memoir, Anticipate Every Goodbye, and   118 118 Going against the tide spiritual journal, Morning Light, speak to the changed role of the priest in French society. On the Irish side, we will consider Joseph Dunn’s No Lions in the

in Tracing the cultural legacy of Irish Catholicism
Claire Mitchell

the roles it plays in social and political life. From the Catholic Church’s involvement in education to the Protestant preachers active in politics, religion is intimately tangled up with how Northern Ireland is organised. Some have argued that this has a very significant impact on community relations and conflict.1 On the other hand, others maintain that religion is irrelevant to conflict: it only provides the labels of identity, and these labels really mark out competing ethnic groups.2 The chapter therefore asks to what extent religion is involved in social and

in Northern Ireland after the troubles
Bryan Fanning

survival of Catholicism in post-Reformation Ireland as a historical miracle. Ireland’s distinctive religious history – penal laws followed by Catholic Emancipation and a devotional revolution – looked much like post-Reformation Europe in reverse. Catholic churches were mostly newer than Protestant ones and Catholic schools had been integral to the nation-building project that would lead to Irish Independence. The Protestant Church of Ireland was disestablished in 1871 and had lost 4147 Inglis–Are the Irish different_BB_Layout 1 29/07/2014 09:26 Page 45 A Catholic

in Are the Irish different?
Bryan Fanning

’s distinctive religious history – Penal Laws followed by Catholic emancipation and a devotional revolution – looked much like post-­ Reformation Europe in reverse. Catholic churches were mostly newer FANNING 9781784993221 PRINT.indd 44 19/01/2016 13:25 A Catholic vision of Ireland 45 than Protestant ones and Catholic schools had been integral to the nation-building project that would lead to Irish independence. The Protestant Church of Ireland was disestablished in 1871 and had lost much of its political influence. By the time of independence the Catholic Church was on

in Irish adventures in nation-building
Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

6 7 Edward R. Norman, The English Catholic Church in the Nineteenth Century (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1984), p. 2. Robert J. Klaus, The Pope, the Protestants, and the Irish: Papal Aggression and Anti-Catholicism in Mid-Nineteenth Century England (London: Garland Publishing, 1987), p. 228. On 29 September 1850, Pope Pius IX reestablished the English Catholic hierarchy, a canonical form of church government which included a hierarchy of bishops who had episcopal authority over clergy and laity. Frank H. Wallis, Popular Anti-Catholicism in Mid

in Contested identities
Karin Fischer

more and more widespread and the schools were controlled in practice by the Churches.9 To start with, the Catholic Church hierarchy tolerated a system that represented considerable progress compared with the Catholic population’s previous predicament in the field of education. Bishop Doyle, especially, spoke several times in favour of a system of education gathering all Irish children, Catholic and Protestant. This approach was rejected, however, by Paul Cullen, Archbishop of Armagh from 1849, then of Dublin from 1851. He had recently returned from Rome, where

in Schools and the politics of religion and diversity in the Republic of Ireland