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Andrew Whiting

has unique qualities given the architecture of the internet to produce ‘What if?’ and indeed ‘Not if but when?’ mentalities that, to paraphrase Joseba Zulaika and William Douglass (1996) , leave us always waiting for cyber-threats. What has been uncovered within this industry expert discourse appears to offer another example of an aspect of contemporary politics that is being ‘defined at the horizon of unknown, yet catastrophic future events’ ( Aradau and Van Munster, 2012 , p. 98). In particular, in the aftermath of the events of 11 September 2001, this

in Constructing cybersecurity
Insights from 'Africa's World War'

Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making addresses debates on liberal peace and the policies of peacebuilding through a theoretical and empirical study of resistance in peacebuilding contexts. Examining the case of ‘Africa’s World War’ in the DRC, it locates resistance in the experiences of war, peacebuilding and state-making by exploring discourses, violence and everyday forms of survival as acts that attempt to challenge or mitigate such experiences. The analysis of resistance offers a possibility to bring the historical and sociological aspects of both peacebuilding and the case of the DRC, providing new nuanced understanding of these processes and the particular case.

The case of Romania

The post-communist transition in Romania has been a period rife with high hopes and expectations as well as strong disappointments and disillusions. The engagement with these disappointments or disillusions has mainly fallen along the lines of critical editorial comments by dissidents and intellectuals or academic engagements that connect it to different forms of social and political apathy. What seems to be lacking however, is a more head-on engagement with disillusionment as a self-contained process that is not just a side-effect of political corruption or economic failures but rather an intrinsic part of any transition. This book provides the basis for a theory of disillusionment in instances of transition. It also elaborates on how such a theory could be applied to a specific case-study, in this instance, the Romanian transition from communism to capitalism. By defining disillusionment as the loss of particularly strong collective illusions, the book identifies what those illusions were in the context of the Romanian 1989 Revolution. It also seeks to understand the extent to which disillusionment is intrinsic to social change, and more importantly, determine whether it plays an essential role in shaping both the direction and the form of change. The book further inevitably places itself at the intersection of a number of different academic literatures: from regional and comparative studies, political science and "transitology" studies, to sociology, psychology and cultural studies.

The case of the Timisoara revolutionaries
Anca Mihaela Pusca

to go out in the streets, he would not attempt to topple the Ceausescu regime and would in fact choose to wait for a more reformist communist government.1 Another two leaders of the Timisoara Revolution, Claudiu Iordache and Lorin Fortuna have expressed similar feelings of disappointment and regret.2 The period immediately following the revolution, including the new political regime, the transition process and the series of democratic reforms, caught many of the revolutionaries by surprise. And yet, was that not what they were out in the streets for? Surprisingly

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

the material relationship between states and societies, or even of the natural struggle against poverty (Ouendji 2009; Latouche 2007; Ward 1973).3 Although a similar argument should be made of discursive and violent practices so far observed, creative survival figures prominently as an example of how patterns of resistance are recontextualised alongside changes in political and economic circumstances. Peacebuilding in this sense represents a contemporary snapshot of a historical process in which political, economic and cultural relations connect the local to the

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

vehicles of political participation has become even more prevalent. They provide a way to defend and advance agendas of security provision, control of land and local political authority. This last element permeates Mai Mai ideology and represents the long-term aspirations of the Congolese peasantry. Understanding everyday forms of resistance in the DRC implies acknowledging that the fact that they are based on the lack of direct confrontation and on practices undertaken to attract the minimum amount of repression does not necessarily mean they are without violence

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
A view from below
Marta Iñiguez de Heredia

2 Patterns and practices of everyday resistance: a view from below T What is everyday resistance? he informalities, ambiguities and contradictions that peacebuilding runs into reflect the political nature of the process. These become visible when examined from the everyday practices of the actors involved. In IR the everyday has become synonymous with the makings of actual subjects in their most quotidian roles (Autesserre 2014; Hobson and Seabrooke 2007; Mitchell 2011b; Neumann 2002). This is not so much a new field of study, as it represents a common call

in Everyday resistance, peacebuilding and state-making
Anca Mihaela Pusca

concept of shock within a political context, he was perhaps also the one who marked the beginning of the transition from a negative to a positive connotation of shock, by acknowledging that shock was a necessary part of modernity, one that was not likely to go away soon and one in which the individual could even be able to rejoice. Slowing down the process of shock and absorption of shock can allow the individual important insights into the nature of change and modern society and create a space where shock becomes a period of revelation, of awakening and realization of

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
Abstract only
Anca Mihaela Pusca

developing a new theory of illusion formation and disillusionment, drawing from studies in psychology, anthropology, urban and visual studies, I have sought to give more complexity to phenomena that would otherwise appear overly simplistic. I have sought to dispel common assumptions that the much talked-about disillusionment haunting post-revolutionary Central and Eastern Europe was nothing more than individual pessimism related to economic shortages or a form of political apathy caused by too much governmental and institutional corruption. If anything, I have tried to

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment
The case of the Group for Social Dialogue
Anca Mihaela Pusca

6 The illusions and disillusions of civil society: the case of the Group for Social Dialogue Based on a series of interviews with the founding members of the Group for Social Dialogue—the first civil society organization in post-revolutionary Romania—clippings from the group’s magazine entitled 22—one of the most popular political magazines in the months immediately following the revolution—as well as a rich secondary literature on the larger concept of civil society, as viewed and interpreted by a number of leading Central and Eastern European writers and

in Revolution, democratic transition and disillusionment