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Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

planners in ways that are rarely recorded explicitly. So, what does an archaeology of lunacy look like? While lunacy in the past was not exclusively institutional, the study of historic asylums allows for a quantitative survey of the ways in which lunacy was conceived of and treated. This study of the subject of lunacy and asylums focuses, therefore, on the archaeology of those institutions where lunacy was managed within a framework: the asylums. Approaches to this subject in the United States and Australia have drawn heavily on historical

in An archaeology of lunacy
From Samoa with Love? at the Museum Fünf Kontinente, Munich
Hilke Thode-Arora

Germany between 1895 and 1911 with the Marquardt brothers, and to match these names with the faces in the historical photos of the show. This was the starting point in reconstructing their villages of origin and locating descendants in Samoa, Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia whom I could ask about Samoan perspectives. These conversations provoked a number of genealogical stories, oral history narratives of the Samoan travellers’ lives before and after their participation in the tours, and their impressions while in Germany. There were also material reminiscences

in Curatopia
Jette Sandahl

, Indigenous-driven museums in  other parts of the world, like the NMAI, Te Papa or the National Museum of Australia, carrying a – in professional circles often only whispered, hinted 5.5  A table setting from a marae (the work Nemesis, by artist Reuben Patterson), and a paˉtaka (food storehouse) all to be interpreted as commentary on the theme of sustainability, in the exhibition E Tū Ake (as Leurs trésors sont une âme) at the Musée du Quai Branly, Paris, France, 2011. 81 82 Europe and ­intimated – delegitimisation of the epistemologies of Indigenous curating. The

in Curatopia
Curatorial bodies, encounters and relations
Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu, Moana Nepia, and Philipp Schorch

18 He alo aˉ he alo / kanohi ki te kanohi / face-to-face: curatorial bodies, encounters and relations Noelle M.K.Y. Kahanu, Moana Nepia and Philipp Schorch In spring 2016, two of the authors, Noelle Kahanu and Moana Nepia, boarded a plane from Honolulu, Hawai‘i, to Auckland, Aotearoa New Zealand, destined for the Pacific Arts Association conference. Kahanu had previously initiated a consultation project between the Bernice Pauahi Bishop Museum, Hawai‘i, Native Hawaiian cultural practitioners and museums in Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia. The most significant

in Curatopia
An alternative design source
J. Peter Phillips

single blocks of granite transported hundreds of miles from Aswan would have made them very valuable. Six monolithic granite palmiform columns were excavated by Naville in 1891 from the pronaos of Herakleopolis Magna and sent to museums: the British ‘palmiform’ columns 439 Museum (EA 1123), the Manchester Museum (1780), Bolton Museum and Art Gallery (1891.14.1/1891.14.2), the South Australian Museum at Adelaide (inventory number not known), the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (91.259), and the University Museum, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia (E636

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Vilsoni Hereniko

Virtual museums and new directions? Vilsoni Hereniko The word ‘museum’ for me evokes images of cultural objects in glass cases that reflect an era which is dead and gone. This has been my experience visiting most museums in different countries in Oceania. The better-funded museums in Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand as well as North America and Europe (including the United Kingdom), on the other hand, appear to be more vibrant and able to attract tourists and residents in larger numbers. The Hawaiian Hall and the Pacific Hall of the Bishop Museum in Honolulu

in Curatopia
Taking care of difference in museums
Billie Lythberg, Wayne Ngata, and Amiria Salmond

’s former empires, in a sort of pattern of reverse intellectual colonisation, from the so-called settler colonies of Canada, Aotearoa New Zealand and Australia, as well as the USA, back to the former imperial centres. In particular, it seems that national museums in those places – as spaces dedicated to culture – were among the first government institutions to fully implement liberal democratic state-sponsored multiculturalism, beginning in the 1970s and 1980s.10 And if the earliest museums to adopt strongly multiculturalist policies and administrative structures were

in Curatopia
Patricia Lambert-Zazulak

UK, Australia, the USA, Chile, Greece, Germany and Canada. The bank also contains some samples from mummies originating in Sudan, South America and the Canary Islands. The tissue bank’s records Occasionally remains cannot be biopsied, as for example in the case of those now located in the American south-west, where there may be an agreement with local tribes that all human remains in museum collections will not be sampled; or where the remains are inaccessible due to thick and tight wrappings. Nevertheless they may still be photographed, X-rayed and recorded, thus

in Mummies, magic and medicine in ancient Egypt
Abstract only
Katherine Fennelly

institutional framework of the asylum in secondary literature. Australian historian Lee-Ann Monk argues, for example, that male keepers in Australian asylums in the Victorian period reinforced masculine gender dominance in the asylum, through the authority inherent in their position and their assertion of patient control through physical action. Thus, keepers asserted their masculinity among other keepers, as well as over the patients (Monk 2003 : 70–1). In the same volume on Australian asylums and madness, Dolly MacKinnon includes the activity of keepers and nurses in the

in An archaeology of lunacy
An epistemology of postcolonial debate
Larissa Förster and Friedrich von Bose

3 Concerning curatorial practice in ethnological museums: an epistemology of postcolonial debates Larissa Förster and Friedrich von Bose Debating ethnological museums in the German-speaking world1 Since the early 2000s, ethnological museums have come under increased scrutiny in the German-speaking world, as elsewhere.2 While in North America, Australia and Aotearoa New Zealand they have had to confront and react to postcolonial critiques for much longer, colonial history has only comparatively recently started to enter public discourse and the politics of

in Curatopia