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Andrew J. May

: Welsh missionary activity and British imperialism’ in Charlotte Williams, Neil Evans and Paul O’Leary (eds), A Tolerant Nation? Exploring Ethnic Diversity in Wales (Cardiff, 2003 ), p. 38. 4 See William Williams, Welsh Calvinistic Methodism: A Historical Sketch of the Presbyterian

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Andrew J. May

north-east, as a key resource of British imperialism, melded the needs of science and strategy, and was an important institutional form for the EIC in its transition from an empire of trade to one of territorial administration and control. 15 Botany, geology and geography served multiple purposes; being scientifically minded, as Arnold notes, could be ‘politically advantageous’. 16 As

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Andrew J. May

British imperialism in the north was thus of a benign and essentially reluctant expansionist, never actively seeking territory by conquest, but almost inadvertently amassing kingdoms from the ocean to the Himalayas within a hundred miles of China, and east to Cochin China (Indochina). Assam, Arakan, Chittagong, Tenasserim – even west across the Indus River to Afghanistan; such

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Andrew J. May

The core questions of this book have been to determine something of the nature of British imperialism in the Khasi Hills, and to explore the ways in which the motives and expectations of its various agents were interconnected. As a study of elements of Christian religious belief and practice, the book’s final chapters will use Thomas Jones

in Welsh missionaries and British imperialism
Abstract only
Andrekos Varnava

pawn. In 1915, a formal offer was made to Greece’s government, but it was rejected. This study examines Cyprus’ progress from a perceived imperial asset to an expendable backwater, explaining how the Union Jack came to fly over the island and why after thirty-five years the British wanted to lower it. It deals with British imperialism and the problem of the worthless territorial acquisition. Ultimately

in British Imperialism in Cyprus, 1878–1915
The contexts
Andrekos Varnava

, XIV, 2, 1961–2, 187–209; Sanderson, ‘The European Partition of Africa’, 10–11 . 50 P.J. Cain and A.G. Hopkins, British Imperialism: Innovation and Expansion, 1688–1914 , London, 1993 ; ‘The Theory and Practise of British Imperialism’ in Raymond Dumett (ed.), Gentlemanly Capitalism and British Imperialism

in British Imperialism in Cyprus, 1878–1915
Daniel Owen Spence

–xvi. 14 Ibid. , pp. 224–232. 15 Correlli Barnett, The Collapse of British Power (London, 1972 ), p. 120. 16 Bernard Porter, The Lion’s Share: A Short History of British Imperialism, 1850– 1995 (London, 1996), p

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Abstract only
Daniel Owen Spence

apathetically ‘sea blind’ 49 Hong Kong public. English’s latter explanation has more overt relevance for Hong Kong, a colony bordered by China’s civil war between the Kuomintang and the Chinese Communist Party since 1927; here the threat of ‘red’ identity to British imperialism was very real. Trafalgar Day’s role in fortifying imperial unity is reflected in

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Daniel Owen Spence

government funding led the KRNVR to seek financial support elsewhere. Just as British imperialism was reliant upon collaborating ruling elites, so too the Admiralty depended upon local allies. One of Britain’s and the Navy’s biggest supporters in Mombasa was Sir Ali bin Salim, representative for Arab interests on Kenya’s Legislative Council, and the Sultan of Zanzibar’s Liwali

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67
Daniel Owen Spence

naval unit, maybe they will take us as POWs [prisoners of war] or maybe kill us. You heard stories of Japanese brutality in China. So I left. 76 As in East Africa, British imperialism in Southeast Asia relied on collaboration with the local sultans, to control the Malay population through adat – Malay

in Colonial naval culture and British imperialism, 1922–67