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Abstract only
Carmen M. Mangion

in spiritual life which at one and the same time empowered and confined them’.1 This book argues that religious belief provided nineteenth-century Catholic women religious with the tools to transcend the normative boundaries of femininity and to redefine the parameters of womanhood. This is not to say that these redefined parameters were all empowering; women religious willingly accepted many of the strictures of the Roman Catholic Church that subjected them to its patriarchal structure and sometimes limited their actions. Yet women religious had more authority and

in Contested identities
David Geiringer

assesses the understanding of female sexuality that was constructed by these experts and the effect this had on Catholic women’s marital experiences. Second, June’s response epitomised the way that many of the interviewees conflated the Church’s teaching on contraceptive morality with its wider approach to sex. My question was about her experience of practising NFP, but her response

in The Pope and the pill
Voluntary women’s organisations and the representation of housewives, mothers and citizens
Caitríona Beaumont

this aspect of the MU’s work, its engagement with the notion of citizenship for women and its agency in participating in national campaigns to secure a better future for its members, which will be discussed and evaluated in the following chapters. The Catholic Women’s League The increasing number of middle-class women participating in philanthropic, religious and educational work during the late nineteenth century resulted in the proliferation of mothers’ meetings, new voluntary women’s groups and organisations for young women. By the end of the century a number of

in Housewives and citizens
Cara Delay

6 Women, priests, and power From January 1879 through December 1880, Edward McCabe, the Catholic archbishop of Dublin, received eighty-three letters written by lay Catholic women.1 In their letters, Dublin’s Catholic women wrote of poverty, family, and politics. They requested McCabe’s assistance with making ends meet and mediating neighbourly conflicts. Many sought their archbishop’s help in negotiating their relationships with their priests.2 These women also, however, asserted their own wishes and desires, declaring that they were in fact central actors in the

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
Abstract only
Cara Delay

weak. Women’s devotional worlds thus were syncretic – intensely Catholic but also steeped in vernacular popular traditions including holy well devotions and fairy belief. By the late nineteenth-century ‘devotional revolution’ (1850–75),4 when the Church reorganised and rebuilt, lay Catholic women came to occupy the public spaces of the parish and chapel in unprecedented numbers. And in the first half of the twentieth century, Irish women’s Catholicism became not only popular but also material and commercial, bolstered by a remarkable flourishing of publications and

in Irish women and the creation of modern Catholicism, 1850–1950
War and protest
Caitríona Beaumont

of The Catholic Women’s League Magazine that a debate on equal pay for equal work had taken place at a meeting of the Westminster Diocesan Branch and the motion in favour had been carried by a large majority.96 There is no evidence to suggest,   149   Beaumont_Housewives.indd 149 06/06/2013 14:09 housewives and citizens however, that either group ever contemplated a national campaign in order to bring about this legislative change. The TG also refused to support officially the EPCC’s campaign on the grounds that it was a political question. The Guild did

in Housewives and citizens
Voluntary women’s organisations and the women’s movement 1950–64
Caitríona Beaumont

Modernity: Reconstructing Britain 1945–1964 (London: Rivers Oram Press, 1999), p. 3 cited in Langhamer, ‘The Meanings of Home’, p. 361. 6 WL, 5/FWI/A/2/2/07, Box 40, NFWI Archive, Annual Report 1955, BL, Mothers’ Union Handbook, 1955, BL, National Union of Townswomen’s Guilds Annual Report, 1955, The Catholic Women’s League Magazine, 499 (March–April 1955), p. 2, BL, ‘Memorandum Submitted by the NCW to the Royal Commission on Marriage and Divorce’, Paper No. 83, Thursday 6 November 1952. 7 The Mothers’ Union Workers’ Paper (July 1950), p. 68. 8 WL, 5/FWI/A/2

in Housewives and citizens
David Geiringer

what it was dealing with. It was a symbol of how out of touch they were.’ 4 While Catholic women’s immediate responses to the publication of Humanae Vitae are addressed more fully in Chapter 4 on early marriage, this chapter focuses on how this ‘symbol’ of the Church’s detachment from the laity came about. Two related arguments are advanced; first, that the commission did indeed neglect certain

in The Pope and the pill
Abstract only
Post-war modernity and religious vocations
Carmen Mangion

bishop). 21 Despite this antipathy, the Catholic laity were benefiting from these initiatives and becoming more educated, more socially active and more questioning. 22 An educated middle-class Catholic milieu was growing in number and finding its place in the church and the professions. 23 The Holy See’s emphasis of a lay apostolate from the 1920s was slow to take hold in England, but the Catholic laity was flexing its muscles. Some Catholic social organisations such as the Newman Society, Catholic Action and the Catholic Women’s League provided places for like

in Catholic nuns and sisters in a secular age
Alana Harris

her worldwide devotion after her death in 1897 and through the globalisation of her cult in the first three decades of the twentieth century.2 Focusing on the pivotal part played by Father Thomas Nimmo Taylor (1873–1963) in the beatification process, and the part played by other bishops and clergy throughout Britain, including both Lancashire and London, this chapter also explores the role of ordinary Catholic women and men in the ‘making’ of devotion to this now ubiquitous saint. British Catholics were foundational to the evolution of the fin de siècle cult of the

in Making and remaking saints in nineteenth-century Britain