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Fred Botting

with jewels and fine dresses. There are greater luxuries and riches to be enjoyed in the castle itself. But this is only the beginning of a mock Gothic romance by Angela Carter, the short story entitled ‘The Bloody Chamber’. The husband, of course, will turn out villainous, that much is clear from his three previous wives, his waxen, ageless skin, the ‘carnal avarice’ of his

in Limits of horror
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E.J. Clery and Robert Miles

, Dublin, where he took orders, Maturin was the most significant of the late Gothic romancers. Indeed, his Melmoth the Wanderer (1820) has often been used as the terminal date of the first wave of Gothic writing. As he makes clear in the following ‘preface’, Maturin was acutely aware of his belated status as a writer persisting in a style that ‘was out’ when he was a boy. Despite his protestations to the

in Gothic documents
Open Access (free)
The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

entirely in Ireland, with the main activity of the tale occurring in fifteenth-century Munster and Ulster. Melville's preface explains that its subject matter – the White Knight himself – was a real person: ‘ There were formerly three branches of the family of Fitzgerald, distinguished in Ireland by the titles of the White Knight, the Knight of Kerry, and the Knight of Glynn. The first, which I have chosen as the subject of the following pages, is now extinct ’. 1 The narrative that follows clearly aligns itself with a Radcliffean tradition of gothic romance in

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Novelistic expression of radicalism in the works of Godwin, Holcroft and Bage
Marion Leclair

the mass-produced sentimental novels and gothic romances published by the Minerva Press and disseminated through the country to a rapidly growing readership by the circulating libraries. In such conditions, with novels being an eminently marketable ware, it is no wonder that their style declined, as Godwin explains in a manuscript essay on ‘History and Romance’ which was published only after his death: Novels, as an object of trade among booksellers, are of a peculiar cast. There are few by which immense sums of money can be expected to be gained. There is scarcely

in Radical voices, radical ways
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The Catholic other in Horace Walpole and Charles Maturin
Robert Miles

from within, the fear that enthusiasm is ‘corruption’ indeed, a force equally compromised by a tendency to despotism, subjugation and religious war. Turning to Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1765), the prototype of Gothic romance, is the quickest way of taking one’s generic bearings when discussing early Gothic, which is what I wish now to do. After that I will briefly

in European Gothic
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Horror now and then
Fred Botting

credulity, a primitive, immature stage of culture akin to childhood (Addison, Scott). Curiously, however, ghosts and spectres kept on returning in Gothic romances, popular dramas and spectacular entertainments. These remnants of a superseded era, like the ruins, old and new, that littered country estates, haunted an enlightened present. Like Horace Walpole’s ‘Gothic story’ and his fake ‘Gothic’ mansion

in Limits of horror
Generic and thematic mutations in horror film
Editors: Richard J. Hand and Jay McRoy

From its earliest days, horror film has turned to examples of the horror genre in fiction, such as the Victorian Gothic, for source material. The horror film has continually responded to cultural pressures and ideological processes that resulted in new, mutated forms of the genre. Adaptation in horror cinema is a useful point of departure for articulating numerous socio-cultural trends. Adaptation for the purposes of survival proves the impetus for many horror movie monsters. This book engages generic and thematic adaptations in horror cinema from a wide range of aesthetic, cultural, political and theoretical perspectives. These diverse approaches further evidence the horror genre's obsession with corporeal transformation and narratological re-articulation. Many horror films such as Thomas Edison's Frankenstein, John S. Robertson's Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde, David Cronenberg'sVideodrome, Abel Ferrara's Body Snatchers, and Terence Fisher's The Gorgon are discussed in the book. The book sheds welcome light upon some of the more neglected horror films of cinema's first century, and interrogates the myriad alterations and re-envisionings filmmakers must negotiate as they transport tales of terror between very different modes of artistic expression. It extends the volume's examination of adaptation as both an aesthetic process and a thematic preoccupation by revealing the practice of self-reflexivity and addresses the remake as adaptation. The book analyses the visual anarchy of avant-garde works, deploys the psychoanalytic film theory to interpret how science and technology impact societal secularisation, and explores the experimental extremes of adaptation in horror film.

Open Access (free)
Christina Morin

critical assumptions shaping our current understanding of both Irish and gothic literary production in this period. Relevant and timely work by the team behind the Leverhulme-funded Lady's magazine (1770–1818) project has added weight to the appeal for scholarship made here. What Jennie Batchelor calls ‘the Minerva Press fiction of the Romantic periodical marketplace’, the Lady's magazine offered its many readers a wide range of literary and cultural delights each month, including short and serialised fiction, some of it excerpts from gothic romances

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Susanne Becker

The gothic romance is one of the most popular literary forms ever. Since its origins two hundred years ago, it has attracted mass audiences and intellectuals alike. Having emerged with the novel and the earliest forms of modern mass entertainment in the last decades of the eighteenth century, the gothic exhibits unchanged vitality in the present media age, obsessed with

in Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions
Susanne Becker

patterns of power familiar to female readers and writers in (and since) Radcliffe’s cultural historical context. Therefore, gothic anti-realism addresses the very real ideology of woman’s place – the home. Which brings us back to the metaphor of the house and to the related excess-effect of defamiliarisation. The castle of Udolpho itself is the perfect example of the gothic romance’s

in Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions