The internal factors
Ali Riaz

3 Identity, Islamism and politics: the internal factors A nalytical and ethnographic studies about the British-Bangladeshi community conducted around the turn of the twentieth century1 and the events described in Chapter 2 demonstrate that a Muslim identity has gained salience among a section of British-Bangladeshis, especially the younger generation. ‘More and more young Bengalis now identify themselves first and foremost as Muslims rather than as Bengali or Bangladeshi,’ concluded Gardner and Shukur in 1994.2 Until the late 1980s, the Bengali ethnic identity

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
The state as actor
Ali Riaz

4 Identity, Islamism and politics: the state as actor T he state plays a pivotal, perhaps the central role, in ethnic identity politics, and this is truer for welfare states like Britain. Whilst the members of the ethnic community, especially their leaders, define the parameters of the group identity, instrumentalize these features through various means and claim the representation, the state provides the legitimacy to these identities within the social and political realms. Werbner has aptly described the actions of community members and actions of the state

in Islam and identity politics among British-Bangladeshis
Clara Eroukhmanoff

Chapter 1 unpacked the methodological tools to examine the securitisation of Islam post-9/11 in the US context and explored, broadly speaking, the question of language in the constitution of reality, which paved the way for applying these insights in securitisation studies. Chapter 2 examines securitisation theory from the perspective of the CS. Instead of viewing threats as objective, security from the CS perspective becomes a self-referential practice because the issue is presented as such by an elite (Buzan et

in The securitisation of Islam
Jonathan Benthall

As noted in the Introduction, there is a small research literature on the question of ‘cultural proximity’. My own attempts to explore it – based on field visits to Mali and Aceh – have partly confirmed the thesis that Islamic NGOs can, on occasion, benefit from a privileged relationship with beneficiaries in Muslim countries

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Jonathan Benthall

This personal account of the Swiss government funded mediation or conflict resolution project (2005–13) was first published in Gulf Charities and Islamic Philanthropy in the ‘Age of Terror’ and Beyond , edited by Robert Lacey and myself (Gerlach Press, 2014). Special attention is given here to the Gulf

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Laurens de Rooij

been pointed out earlier, the media informs the primary understandings and interpretations of the issues it discusses. But if the media reports are the sole source of information on Islam and Muslims, it is not surprising that the meaning of Islam and Muslims among the public reflects what is portrayed in the media. This means that to the British public, the media seems to be successful at informing them. If media portrayals are as impactful as some would suggest, then that raises questions about the impact of education, politics, and other areas of public and

in Islam in British media discourses
François Burgat

Islam the primary focus of my research. Ineluctably, however, it came to incorporate itself to my research themes, to the point that today it is central to them—inevitably, given the phenomenon of “French jihadism.” The scholarly construction of Islamism as a research object has to my mind been inseparably tied to the representation of French Muslims by their compatriots steeped in Christian, Jewish, or agnostic religious culture. Granted, the width of the Mediterranean is incompressible. It makes the conditions in which a Muslim in France

in Understanding Political Islam
Jonathan Benthall

Pennsylvania, 2014). My contribution appeared as the opening chapter in a volume published later that year, Understanding Islamic Charities , edited by Jon B. Alterman and Karin von Hippel. It is an overview which I still stand by in 2015 despite all the geopolitical changes since 2007. A theme that occurs elsewhere in this book is the unsatisfactory state of academic

in Islamic charities and Islamic humanism in troubled times
Vicky Randall

discussions of the life of Muhammad, the nature of Islam, and the conquests of the Arab Muslims (or ‘Saracens’) in India, Central Asia, the Middle East, North Africa, and parts of Europe. Freeman’s own work on this topic, The History and Conquests of the Saracens (1856), was his first volume on a historical subject, and it was published when he was just thirty-three. Based on a series of six lectures he delivered at the Philosophical Institution in Edinburgh the previous year, Freeman produced his Saracens ‘under the idea that a brief sketch of the principal facts of

in History, empire, and Islam
François Burgat

debates. From One Islamism to Another Gilles Kepel and Olivier Roy have enjoyed much greater media exposure than I have. The task of periodically outlining our differences has fallen upon my shoulders—since this has been the only means to assert the legitimacy of the contrarian interpretations that I have sought to defend. Kepel and Roy have enjoyed greater media exposure for two reasons: one good one—and one less so. The first is that media attention is largely driven by book promotion. Both of them have, in this

in Understanding Political Islam