The spectacle of death and the aesthetics of crowd control
Emma Galbally and Conrad Brunström

and Miranda (1798) – James Boaden’s adaptation of Matthew Lewis’s The Monk (1796) – and George Reynolds’ Bantry Bay ( 1797 ). Boaden had originally titled his play Ambrosio , after Lewis’s main character, but was forced by the Examiner of Plays, John Larpent, to change it to Aurelio , creating greater distance between the play and its

in The Gothic and death
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

model to which subsequent Gothic writers adhered or from which they departed. The inclusion of Matthew Lewis’s The Monk ( 1796 ) is essential to disrupt the Gothic genealogy that so frequently reads Radcliffe’s The Italian ( 1797 ) as a reaction to Lewis’s novel without first examining The Monk as a response to and radical departure from the Radcliffean model of sibling

in Gothic incest
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

reference to Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto and Matthew Lewis’ The Monk . Attention will be given to a neglected reading of Walpole’s novel as a satire of Henry VIII, while Lewis’ Bleeding Nun, who is resurrected in later works, will be seen to represent aspects of the Reign of Terror in revolutionary France. Many critics regard the Gothic novel as traditionally anti

in Dangerous bodies
A genealogy
Editor: Robert Miles

This book investigates discursive structures intermittently recurring through Gothic writing, and provides intertextual readings, exemplifications of contemporaneously understood, discursively inflected, debate. By drawing on the ideas of Michel Foucault to establish a genealogy, it brings Gothic writing in from the margins of 'popular fiction', resituating it at the centre of debate about Romanticism. The book stresses that the intertextual readings form the methodological lynchpin for interpreting Gothic writing as self-aware debate on the character of the subject. Foucault's theory of discourse enables readers to gain an historical purchase on Gothic writing. The book traces the genealogy of a particular strand, the 'Gothic aesthetic', where a chivalric past was idealized at the explicit expense of a classical present. It introduces the reader to the aspects of Gothic in the eighteenth century including its historical development and its placement within the period's concerns with discourse and gender.

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Marie Mulvey-Roberts

’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), Matthew Lewis’ The Monk (1796), Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein (1818), Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897) and F. W. Murnau’s Nosferatu (1922). These texts, along with many others, will be explored in terms of how they mirror real human suffering brought about by the systematic violation of rights to freedom and humanity. In addition, some uncomfortable questions

in Dangerous bodies
Matthew Lewis’s The Monk and the Marquis de Sade’s La Nouvelle Justine
Angela Wright

biographical attention (Lever 1991 ; Schaeffer 1999 ). What is less well documented, however, is the mutually influential relationship under which both authors’ work flourished. The tracing of Matthew Lewis’s numerous ‘borrowed’ sources in The Monk began swiftly after the novel’s publication. In 1797, for example, an article in the Monthly Review took pleasure in identifying in The

in European Gothic
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Conflict Gothic
Marie Mulvey-Roberts

the French Revolution. He expressed particular admiration for Matthew Lewis’ The Monk , which can be read as a gory map of the Terror and the anti-clericalism blighting France from 1793 to 1794, a process continued by several of his imitators. 6 Yet this was by no means the bloodiest conflict within living memory. A longer-lasting and more global conflict with a much greater death toll was the Seven Years War, which Winston

in Dangerous bodies
Abstract only
David Annwn Jones

tryst, vicious murder, veiled strangers, the grisly contents of the urn and Blandine’s madness can be recognised as exactly kind of Gothic melodrama as might be seen in Matthew Lewis’s The Castle Spectre (1797) and Thomas Holcroft’s A Tale of Mystery (1802). Few graphic sequences embody Otranto- esque themes as directly as George Cruikshank’s satiric triptych

in Gothic effigy
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

by writers such as Ann Radcliffe and Eliza Parsons, challenges the notion of chaste maternity by revealing the mother as sexually desirable and aligning her rediscovery with her daughter’s sexual awakening. 11 Gothic texts by writers such as Matthew Lewis, William Beckford, Eugenia de Acton and Charlotte Dacre rearticulate this subversion through a queering of desires that creates male victims

in Gothic incest
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David Annwn Jones

and early nineteenth centuries it is surely the ubiquity, indeed the power, of the ominous crypt at the heart of the setting’ (Hogle, 1980 : 333). It is in the labyrinthine passages of the burial ground and subterranean cavern under the monastery and convent in Matthew Lewis’s The Monk that Ambrosio encounters the treacherous demon. Ambrosio hides Antonio in the catacombs in order to seduce her

in Gothic effigy