Doctors’ organisations and activist medics
Julian M. Simpson

gathering.19 There was also a close connection between Rooin Boomla’s political opposition to British rule in India and his commitment to the NHS before it was established: he described becoming a socialist because he felt like ‘a second-​class citizen in an imperial design’ and being ‘in favour of the NHS from the beginning as a socialist.’20 If the legacy of empire could shape doctors’ opinions, the post-​war context of immigration to Britain also influenced the development of their political identities. Margaret Thatcher’s views on migrant communities were described by

in Migrant architects of the NHS
Angelica Michelis

This article engages with the discourse of food and eating especially as related to the representation of the abject eating-disordered body. I will be particularly interested in the gothic representation of the anorexic and bulimic body in samples of medical advice literature and NHS websites and how they reinforce popular myths about anorexia by imagining the eating disordered body as a fixed object of abjection. Focusing on the use of gothic devices, tropes and narrative structure, these imaginations will be read against alternative representations of anorexic/bulimic bodies in autobiographical illness narratives, fictional accounts and a psychoanalytical case history in order to explore how gothic discourses can help opening up new understandings and conceptions of illness, healing and corporeality in the dialogue between medical staff and patients.

Gothic Studies
Open Access (free)
Planned Obsolescence of Medical Humanitarian Missions: An Interview with Tony Redmond, Professor and Practitioner of International Emergency Medicine and Co-founder of HCRI and UK-Med

already there. TRM: That is what UK-Med tries to do, right, taking people working for the NHS who are trained in care as we deliver it in this part of the world and take that overseas? TR: Yes, and the difficulty we face is how to get them released from the NHS to do this, and here again the innovation needs to be conceptual. First of all, and again coming down to consequence , there is enlightened self-interest for our country to let their medical staff do this type of work. Of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
British hospital contributory schemes in the twentieth century

This book presents a comprehensive account of a major innovation in hospital funding before the NHS. The voluntary hospitals, which provided the bulk of Britain’s acute hospital services, diversified their financial base by establishing hospital contributory schemes. Through these, working people subscribed small, regular amounts to their local hospitals, in return for which they were eligible for free hospital care. The book evaluates the extent to which the schemes were successful in achieving comprehensive coverage of the population, funding hospital services, and broadening opportunities for participation in the governance of health care and for the expression of consumer views. It then explores why the option of funding the post-war NHS through mass contribution was rejected, and traces the transformation of the surviving schemes into health cash plans. This is a substantial investigation into the attractions and limitations of mutualism in health care. It is relevant to debates about organisational innovations in the delivery of welfare services.

Martin Gorsky, John Mohan and Tim Willis

have lacked a conventional commercial instinct, given their idiosyncratic origins, structure and ethos, and the survivors have retained many features of their predecessors. They are non-profit organisations and, unlike private insurers, they have neither challenged the principle of a collective risk pool embodied in the NHS nor attempted to offer a superior alternative. The surviving schemes are distinguished by: their commitment to charitable activity and their support for the NHS; their reliance on voluntary participation in fundraising and governance; and their

in Mutualism and health care
Reorientation under the National Health Service
Martin Gorsky, John Mohan and Tim Willis

Chapter 9 ‘Where the shoe pinches’: reorientation under the National Health Service In an address to the schemes at their 1948 conference, a few months after the creation of the NHS, Aneurin Bevan advised the schemes that, in the changed circumstances, they should ‘Watch to see where the shoe pinches first because it is where the shoe pinches, and if the nation cannot do it, there your voluntary services will be required’.1 This quote has entered the folklore of the contributory scheme movement. This chapter considers the response of the schemes to the

in Mutualism and health care
Open Access (free)
Neil McNaughton

entirely free and totally managed by the state. Funding was passed down through a hierarchy of health authorities which fell under centralised control. Up to the nineteen seventies, all seemed to go well. Economic growth kept Health 39 pace with the increasing demands for health care. The only challenge to the system – a shortfall in funding as the NHS was unexpectedly popular so that visits to the doctor and demand for drugs rose alarmingly – was met by the introduction of prescription charges in 1950. These charges for doctors’ prescriptions were the only way in

in Understanding British and European political issues
Martin Gorsky, John Mohan and Tim Willis

Chapter 8 The contributory schemes and the coming of the National Health Service Reflecting on the BHCSA’s efforts to influence the NHS policy debates, its first historian concluded that: ‘it can certainly never be said that … the Association failed for lack of trying’.1 This chapter reassesses this verdict, through an exploration of the responses of both the BHCSA and individual schemes to plans for the new health service. Its premise is that the shape of the NHS was the outcome of a process of discussion within a policy community of politicians, civil servants

in Mutualism and health care
Abstract only
Martin Gorsky, John Mohan and Tim Willis

practical way of doing this. A third reaction is frustration at the failure of the contributory schemes to act collectively and articulate a plausible alternative in the NHS debates, which meant that the option of preserving some of the attractive features of the movement in the post-war NHS was largely ruled off the agenda. In this brief final chapter we recapitulate the key findings of our work, discuss some pertinent parallels and precedents, and speculate on the prospects for the cash plans. Key findings This work shows the attractions and limitations of a form of

in Mutualism and health care
The state and hospital contribution, 1941–46
Martin Gorsky, John Mohan and Tim Willis

in the planning of the new health service? Histories of the coming of the NHS have detailed the ministerial and bureaucratic deliberations, and the lobbying activities of the BMA and the voluntary hospitals’ BHA. However, little is known of the contributory schemes’ role in this policy process. AbelSmith cursorily dismisses them by noting that: With the possible exception of the HSA, the pre-payment agencies … were unbusinesslike, ineffectively co-ordinated and run by persons without power or influence. They were swept into the background without antagonising any

in Mutualism and health care